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Thread: BUFFING QUESTION

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    BUFFING QUESTION

    I would like opinions please. I am thinking I would like a buffer for the pens I make, but I am cheap. Here is my plan. I have an old Kenmore motor out of a sewing machine. It has s foot pedal to vary the speed with. I'm thinking of mounting it on a board that I can clamp to a table, put a 3" or 4" buffing wheel on it to buff pens. Just cost the price of the wheel, I have a 1/2" mandrel for it. Think it would be worth the trouble to set up?

  2. #2
    Paul...if it has the RPMs I think it would work fine. If the buffing wheels aren't too expensive, get 3 ...one for the red compound, one for the white compound and one for wax.
    Ken
    ------



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    I think the RPM's are OK. But it is a small motor. I can slow it up by pushing a piece of 400 sandpaper against the shaft. Trying to get a little rust off. I guess if I don't have to push very hard and use small wheels I might be able to buff a pen...maybe.. Oh, well worth a try.

    Thanks, Ken

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Floydada, Tx
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    I do not see why it would not work. I have a 1/2hp motor w/ a 12" disk mounted on a board and clamp to the bench. This way I can move it out of the way when not in use.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    Paul...if it has the RPMs I think it would work fine. If the buffing wheels aren't too expensive, get 3 ...one for the red compound, one for the white compound and one for wax.
    I have a bunch of polishing compounds here at home, but here is the thing, I do not know what each one is for? At work we use green before white, but that is in polishing stainless steel. I think at home I have white, brown, red, green and black, You are the first one I have heard of that might know when and where to use the various colors.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Johnson View Post
    I have a bunch of polishing compounds here at home, but here is the thing, I do not know what each one is for? At work we use green before white, but that is in polishing stainless steel. I think at home I have white, brown, red, green and black, You are the first one I have heard of that might know when and where to use the various colors.
    As Ken said, the common routine for wood is tripoli, then white diamond, then wax. The tripoli is considered a "cut buffing" stage, where you're removing scratches and imperfections, the white diamond is the "color buffing", which brings things to a mirror shine. The wax stage is intended as a protective layer, and some feel it adds warmth to the piece.

    Here's a broad description of the different buffing compounds and stages (at least for metal):

    http://www.hobbytool.com/buffing.htm
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  7. #7
    Thanks Vaughn just what I needed to know. I will have to try the black polish on the stainless and see if that cuts better then the green I now use.

    I would use the red rouge on my wedding ring, but I don't wear one. Most machinists don't for obvious reasons, and most woodworkers would be wise to do likewise.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

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