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Thread: Lab made scrub plane.

  1. #1
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    Lab made scrub plane.

    Scrub planes were made for rough work. Hogging off a lot of material at a time. For thinning down a board for example. Last week I had need of a scrub plane. I needed to hog a lot of wood of a paddle I was building. I could use a draw knife but if you have ever used one you know what happens.

    I happened to remember I had a Miller Falls Handy Man plane that I had no intentions of doing anything with. It would be a perfect candidate to covert over. There are some differences like a wide mouth but I figured if I slid the frog back I could try it. So I ground the blade to a rounded shape and sharpened it. Moved back the frog as far as I could and it worked well. Better than expected quit frankly!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    You can see the thick curly shavings. It will hog out a deep trough and quickly. Of course it will tear out and leaves a nasty looking cut but it's supposed to. I am pleased and the price was right!!

    I have been using it tonight to hog off some wood on another Greenland Paddle I am making. I rough it close to the line, then go back with another plan and smooth and finish the line. Saves hours or planing little thin shavings.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  2. #2
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    Very resourceful Jeff. I have never used a scrub plane, do they take a lot of “effort” to push through the wood?
    "I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a
    friend...if you have one."
    --George Bernard Shaw to Winston Churchill

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    --Winston Churchill, in response




  3. #3
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    Cool idea, Jeff. I've got a Proto brand plane that looks like a bigger version of your Millers Falls that might be a good candidate for that. I used it for the first time last night to make a flat spot on a turning blank for the faceplate. (I've recently been using my Bosch power plane to do the same thing, but last night I didn't want to deal with the dust and noise.) For my purposes, it only needs to be approximately flat, so the curved blade should do the trick...only faster.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
    Cool Jeff, its kind of need to convert, manipulate and adjust your tools for your needs.

    As for you Vaughn,watch out my friend. You may get bit by the hand tool bug and only use electrons to see by.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    ...I have never used a scrub plane, do they take a lot of “effort” to push through the wood?
    First off, I must say I am only planning Wester Red Cedar, soft as Butta (butter), But no. I find it takes a lot more force to use my #3 taking of a full width shaving on the same wood. Now if I run it way down, yea it does. But it also makes some horrible cuts too. Of course it leaves a gouged surface anyway, but the tear out and chipping in this cedar gets really bad with a really deep cut.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    146

    Lowly ?

    Don't know, but looks like its chow'n down with a pretty good degree of accuracy. 100 years from now they'll say " what was this guy think'n ". Then they'll lay it on a board and be amazed !

  7. #7
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    Sep 2007
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    St. Louis, MO
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    I did the same thing with a rust pitted old number 4 Stanley. It works just fine, and i used it happily for quite a while. Then, about 2 years after i converted that one over, i picked up a # 40 scrub plane in a box i got at an auction for $1. I cleaned it up a bit and do like it better for 2 reasons - the wood argues less with its thicker blade, and it's a lot lighter than the #4. This comes into play because it's kind of an aerobic activity when you're scrubbing down large panels. I compared the two while flattening off a 30" x 96" laminated maple slab. They both worked just fine, but the #40 was less fatigueing on a "long haul".
    Paul Hubbman

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