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Thread: Need help with a broken car door handle

  1. #1
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    Nov 2006
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    Question Need help with a broken car door handle

    Right after work last night I was trying to help my lab partner open his frozen car door in the parking lot..... I ended up pulling the handle off from his '99 Camry LE! Picture us after a 12 hour shift while it's snowing and blowing ice in the middle of the worst storm we've seen this year.....the cars were covered in ice, then along comes the "cavalry" to rip his door off! Talk about a "Kodak Moment"!

    I need some advice....the part that came off is a plastic flap that looks like it was originally glued to the edge of a metal handle. It appears to glue to the thin edge of the metal so there's not a lot of glueing surface there. Can anyone recommend the best glue for mating these two parts back together?
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  2. #2
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    Hi Scott ,
    Tired and cold are not my favorites. Sorry!
    Don't know about the glue thing so no advice there however if the answer doesn't turn up for reglueing it may be in line to go to "pick a part". We have several on my side of town. Basically it is the auto junk yard connection. It may be easier and work better to buy new/used part off a wrecked vehicle. Good luck, get rest and warm up!
    Shaz
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  3. #3
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    The support is much appreciated Shaz!
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  4. #4
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    Sicamous (sic-a-moose) British Columbia Canada
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    Going for a "part" means more cold weather work. Epoxy must have been used so try that again. This is plastic on metal right? Try and delay your co worker till spring, easier on your hands! If I have this situation all wrong ignore all of the above.

  5. #5
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    Gluing it might work, but I would want to see you do so in a nice heated garage, or you could very well be just wasting you time and glue.

    A new/used part is certainly the best way to go, but replacing it will be a bit of a bear, as you will have to remove the inside of the door and possibly the widow as well, not a huge problem, if you are inside a heated garage, but if you are inside a heated garage, I'd try the glue first!

    Good luck!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Sicamous (sic-a-moose) British Columbia Canada
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    Ummmm...he was HELPING his lab partner...who is buying the new part? Night all, all the help I can give!

  7. #7
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    Carol Stream Illinois
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    Scott,

    The car is a very common model, call the local "pick a part" as shaz suggested, then get your tools and head out for education at that local bone yard. Be sure to bring a battery source (I use the ones from some of my cordless tools) as the cars electrical will more than likely be dead. I have had to cut the wires going to electric windows in order to get things out of the way when fishing for parts. Last year my sons 98 Chevy was broken into, busted out his rear passenger window (wing section), the local glass shop wanted 400.00 to fix. My son received his first lesson in basic car repair, ended up costing 45.00 total, plus I threw some steaks on the Weber after the chore was complete and we had a nice lunch together.
    One other tip when you are pulling your part, grab any clips, screws, plastic trim coveres, ect as you go after your part, they can come in real handy and save possible headaches.

    Heather

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heather Thompson View Post
    Scott,

    The car is a very common model, call the local "pick a part" as shaz suggested, then get your tools and head out for education at that local bone yard. Be sure to bring a battery source (I use the ones from some of my cordless tools) as the cars electrical will more than likely be dead. I have had to cut the wires going to electric windows in order to get things out of the way when fishing for parts. Last year my sons 98 Chevy was broken into, busted out his rear passenger window (wing section), the local glass shop wanted 400.00 to fix. My son received his first lesson in basic car repair, ended up costing 45.00 total, plus I threw some steaks on the Weber after the chore was complete and we had a nice lunch together.
    One other tip when you are pulling your part, grab any clips, screws, plastic trim coveres, ect as you go after your part, they can come in real handy and save possible headaches.

    Heather
    Hi Scott ,
    This information Heather is sharing is great stuff! Pay attention!

    Good luck with a warm fuzzy place to work!
    Shaz
    I am a registered voter and you can be too. We ( registered voters ) select the moderators for this forum by voting every six months for the people we want to watch over this family forum.
    Please join me. Register now.
    Shaz
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  9. #9
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    Dec 2007
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    Tellico Plains, Tennessee
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    We have a guy up in Coker Creek that makes knives... he sometimes glues the handles to the tangs with JB Weld... says its the only thing he ever uses..
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  10. #10
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    It turns out the entire handle was all plastic, not plastic on metal as I thought, but regardless, he was unable to get the epoxy to hold it. I found a new handle on Ebay for ~ $18 shipped and snagged it while he was on vacation. I'm color matching it for him, and he's going to get his mechanic to install it. Not happy he's got spend $25-$50 to fix it, but am pleased I was able to find a new one pretty easily. He feels bad that I bought the part but it was a therapeutic purchase for me! (he even wanted to reimburse me for the glue! ...he's a good egg)

    Thanks for all the tips!
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