Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Hock or Lee Valley A2 Plane Blades?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,008

    Hock or Lee Valley A2 Plane Blades?

    I'm cleaning up the Bailey No. 3 that I recently discovered in the shop, and I want to replace the blade (and possibly the chip breaker). Do I want the Hock blade or the Lee Valley A2 blade? What's your preference?

    I see Woodcraft sells a Hock chip breaker. Is it a worthwhile addition? Is there another one you'd recommend? Is there a better source for these things than Woodcraft or Lee Valley? I'd prefer to buy both parts from the same vendor, to save a few bucks on shipping. (Unfortunately, I don't see that Lee Valley sells chip breakers.)
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
    Posts
    1,407
    I bought a couple of LV A2 blades and have been quite satisfied. They were a bit less expensive than the Hock.

    I kept the same chip breaker - never felt the need to replace it. If you keep yours, you just need to make sure it fits well against the blade. I can tell you how to do that if you need me to.

    Mike
    Last edited by Mike Henderson; 03-10-2008 at 03:34 PM.
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,319
    You might want to consider Lie Neilson blades, too. They also make a good chip breaker. If you do go their site, be sure to click on the section for 'Stanley Replacement Blades' because the regular LN blades are a shade too thick to work in the old Stanleys. The Stanley Replacement blades are just a tad thinner. I have a couple of them, and really like them.

    I also have several Hock blades that I like. Haven't tried Lee Valley blades yet, other than the ones in my LV planes. Those are good, so I'd guess their other blades are, too.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    583
    I've got Hock, LV, and LN replacement blades. No discernable differences among them. They're all quite good and (i'm no metalurgist, but they seem) amazingly similar - do you shave with Remington or Schick?
    If the original blade is a laminated steel blade (Stanley made these for several years) you might consider just replacing the chip breaker and leaving the original blade on the plane. You can tell the laminated blades after you hone a fresh edge. The bevel will clearly indicate a line down the middle where the high carbon steel is laminated to the softer tool steel. It will look like you put a micro bevel on the edge. The high carbon steel takes and holds an edge well and is laminated to the softer steel to keep it plyable. I have one of these laminated blades on one of my smoothers - i'm as happy with it as i am with my thicker A2 cryo blades.
    If you stay with a thin laminated blade, i really would upgrade the chip breaker. I'm partial to the 2 piece Clifton model, but the LV, LN, and Hock one piece versions are a huge improvement over the thin orignals as well.
    Have fun making shavings.
    Paul Hubbman

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,319
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Hubbman View Post
    ...upgrade the chip breaker. I'm partial to the 2 piece Clifton model...
    Paul Hubbman
    I got several of those when Woodcraft (I think) was having a closeout on them. Are they still available? I like them better than the LN's.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tokiwadai, Japan
    Posts
    2,882
    Jim,

    Highland has the 2 piece Clifton chip breakers... Don't know how good the price, but they have them.

    http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/i...S&Category=668

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bucks County PA
    Posts
    149

    Either will work fine!

    When I restored my 604 I left the SW blade in there and just sharpened it. It worked pretty well. BUT after I installed a new Hock blade in it I was totally amazed at the difference! It is now my go to plane. I absolutely love using it.

    I also installed a LV A2 blade in my restored Union No7. This blade worked as well as advertised. Maybe even a bit better. Of course, a well tuned hand plane helps. But you get the idea.

    Either of these fine replacement blades would work well in your hand planes. And as Jim said, don't forget the LN replacement blades. Just be sure to get the type that will fit in with your plane's frog & chip breaker. Some planes can't handle that think of a blade without filing the mouth (something I have avoided doing so far).

    Unless I miss my guess, Craftsman Studios has the best prices on Hock blades. They also offer free shipping.

    http://www.craftsmanstudio.com/html_p/H!BENCH.htm

    Good luck!

    See ya around,
    Dominic
    Last edited by Dominic Greco; 03-12-2008 at 01:29 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,008
    Thanks guys...I ended up ordering a Hock A2 from Craftsman Studio, and the 2-piece Clifton chip breaker from these guys:

    http://www.dilegnosupply.com/

    The rest of the plane is cleaning up well:

    Before:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bailey No. 3 - 1 800.jpg 
Views:	29 
Size:	58.3 KB 
ID:	18535

    And a couple poor "in-progress" shots:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bailey No. 3 - 2 800.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	66.3 KB 
ID:	18536 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bailey No. 3 - 3 500.jpg 
Views:	22 
Size:	38.8 KB 
ID:	18537

    While I'm here, another few questions...I would like to lightly lap the surface of the frog showing in the last pic above. Is there a safe and reliable way to remove the lever? I'm making the rank assumption that making this surface smooth will help make adjustments smoother. Should I bother worrying about it?

    Also, based on the patent dates on the plane body in the second pic, any idea when this plane was made, or the type? Based on earlier pics that weren't as clear, Mike Henderson guessed it was a type 11. How does one determine the type on this plane? Since the lever cap has the oblong (not kidney-shaped) hole, I gather it's from the early 30s or before. (Been reading Patrick's Blood and Gore site.)
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,319
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    ...I would like to lightly lap the surface of the frog showing in the last pic above. Is there a safe and reliable way to remove the lever? I'm making the rank assumption that making this surface smooth will help make adjustments smoother. Should I bother worrying about it?
    Be VERY careful in trying to remove the lateral lever. The frog casting is very brittle, and also pretty thin where the lever attaches. The lever is riveted on, so grinding off any mushrooming on the underside, then drifing the rivet out with a properly fitting pin punch is the way to do it. If you do this, make sure the surrounding area of the frog is well supported by wood, an anvil, etc. I've done it by carving out a wood block to allow the lever to fit into the carved recess and the flat surface to support the frog.

    Replacing it means finding or making a new rivet. I've used brass rod, which is soft and peens over well - again, using much caution. As an aside, I once bought a plane at a flea market that had a small (2d ?) nail being used as the rivet. Sure not pretty, but it worked...
    Last edited by Jim DeLaney; 03-11-2008 at 08:34 PM.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,008
    Hmm...based on your warnings Jim, I'm wondering if I should even attempt it. Might be more prudent to try it on another plane or two at least before I try doing it on this one. I also need to see if the brass rod I have on hand is the right size to make a new rivet. Thanks for the info, Jim.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

Similar Threads

  1. Lee Valley - Apron Plane
    By glenn bradley in forum New Tools
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-27-2011, 03:14 AM
  2. Sharpening plane blades
    By Julio Navarro in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-20-2011, 10:53 PM
  3. Roll up neaders shoulder plane kits @ Hock Tools
    By Rob Keeble in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-05-2010, 03:59 AM
  4. Build of a Krenov Style plane (Ron Hock Kit)
    By Brent Dowell in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 05-05-2010, 12:53 PM
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-07-2008, 08:06 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •