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Thread: Granberg G555B Mini Mill

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    161

    Granberg G555B Mini Mill

    Does anybody have any experience using this small chainsaw mill? I've started giving some serious thought to picking up a light-duty, hobbiest-type chainsaw mill to start using at my in-laws place in the Pocono Mountains. I know that there are size limitations with this type of mill, but I'm not too worried about that for right now. The reviews I've read seem to indicate that this is a decent little piece of equipment, but I'm looking for more feedback. Also, any thoughts on like-type equipment would be appreciated!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mini Mill.jpg  
    "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, then you ARE the sucker. "

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Topeka KS
    Posts
    118
    looks like something a person could build themselves. like a straight cutting edge for a chain saw
    Als ik kan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833
    Chainsaws, for the most part, are not designed to cut along the grain. I have tried with dismal results. I have heard that chains can be specially ground to handle this chore. Or, maybe, special chains can be purchased. Without those, I'm sure you will not be happy with the mini-mill concept.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cedar Park, TX
    Posts
    320
    Yep, they do make special "rip" chains for chain saws. Not something you are likely to find at the big box stores though.

    Chains saws waste a bunch of wood because of the humongous kerf. I think that for most stuff you could handle well with one of those type contraptions, you could do better on a band saw with less waste and a whole lot less hazard.
    Jerry

    http://www.sawdustersplace.com

    "If politics wasn't built on careful deception it wouldn't need its own word and techniques. It would just be called honesty, education, and leadership."
    Bob "Phydeaux" Stewart one day on Woodnet

  5. #5
    Don't waste your money...

    My father had this very idea as well, then looked online and finally purchased plans for a chainsaw mill.

    Even with a big saw...
    Even with a store bought ripping chain (you can make your own very easily though....
    Even with a big bar and small logs....

    We ended up cutting one board today, and got the next board the next day. That is a long way of saying the thing was slow. VERY SLOW!

    We fabricated the sawmill ourselves saving us a pile of money, but even going right by the plans, the saw just did not pan out. The saw kerf alone was terrible, and this is from a family that has a 1/4 inch rotary sawmill, so we know what sawdust waste is.

    lose one out of 4 boards to sawdust on a rotary mill
    lose one out of 3 boards on the chainsaw mill
    lose one out of 16 boards on a bandsaw mill

    In the end we ended up scraping the chainsaw mill. I even think I have a picture of it. My honest to goodness opinion...don't waste your money. save up and buy a smaller bandsaw mill.You will be better off in the long run.

    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    810
    My humble opinion;

    Like many tools, a chainsaw mill will have limitations and will require that the user learn how to use it so as to lessen as far as possible those limitations. My experience with chainsaws and saw chains tell me that just about everything posted so far is true.....

    but ....

    If your goal is to produce a cant (beam / block of wood) that you can haul home to put on a bandsaw to resaw into usable boards, and if the logs you are sawing into cants are big enough that you can't handle them easily as logs, then I think a chainsaw mill is a good way to get from logs to lumber with minimal expense.

    I own a band sawmill that will handle a 30" dia. log, and I am currently running into logs that I will need to make smaller so that they'll fit on my mill. My choices are to truck the logs to a circle mill to be cut into cants, or to set up a chainsaw mill and make them smaller myself. I'll be doing the chainsaw mill.

    cheers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Don't listen to these guys,

    I built one and cut a TON of wood with my chainsaw mill, it worked well, yeah it was hard work, but once I got my chain reground to a rip chain, and had it sharp, pushing downhill the saw just about pulled itself through the log.

    Don't believe it, look at this..........

    >> Logging in Tokyo << (about 4 pages worth there, that is just the first page)





    That is a 4 hour or so day, I would start around 8 AM and have to knock off when the other crew took their lunch break, around noon. A little more than one board a day

    Here is how I built the mill........

    >> Tokyo Log Hog <<

    You are not doing this for money, to make a living etc, so I don't see why you should not do it, get a mill and have at it. An older saw is better, IMHO, as you can find a good one cheaper, and if it has the longer stroke motor, it has more torque, and will work better in this situation.

    I know others will say I'm wrong etc, but I did not just talk about it, I did this, I have a bunch of VERY good pieces of lumber now, that are just about ready to use (air dried) and I'd do this all again.

    Sure the kerf is wider on a chainsaw, compared to a bandmill, but it is all too common in bandmills for the boards to come out a bit wavy, and even just a bit, like a 1/4" on an 8' long board is just as much waste as a chainsaw kerf, so I really think that is a false argument, others will not, that is fine, I'm just offering up my point of view.

    Good luck!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    161
    Stu, I remember the saga very well!! You lost quite a bit of sleep that week, if I remember correctly?

    I appreciate everybody's input!!

    - Keith
    "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, then you ARE the sucker. "

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Topeka KS
    Posts
    118
    see i told you some one could make it! leave it to stu to be the one
    Als ik kan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    Those boards look big, but keep in mind they are leaning against a van the size of a shopping cart.

    To see the Tokyo Log Hog in action, tune in here:

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=mpHWs87laqo
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

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