View Poll Results: Best thing for cutting up sheet goods?

Voters
60. You may not vote on this poll
  • Go with Festool, with a long guide. $640

    30 50.00%
  • Go with EZ-smart, with a new saw. $550

    5 8.33%
  • stick with your redline cutting guide, and your dumpy old circular saw

    14 23.33%
  • Forget it. Doorlink will say no anyway! Pound sand!

    4 6.67%
  • What, are you crazy? You need more turning tools!

    7 11.67%
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Thread: What should I ask for?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inside the Beltway
    Posts
    2,666

    What should I ask for?

    Well, folks, it's that time again. I have three tool acquisition occasions per year: Birthday, Father's day, Christmas. Birthday is coming up. I've got tons of shelves and builtins to build. That means cutting up sheet goods. What should I get? Getting good data on this seems like the old tech religious wars: mac vs pc, wordperfect vs word. Help!

    Thanks,

    Bill

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Bill, I voted for the Festool, in my honest opinion, the $90 difference between the Festool and the EZ with a good new saw, is not very much, over the rest of your lifetime

    I have to again say that I think the real ace in the hole is the Festool saw itself.

    I guess you could try to have the best of both worlds and get the Festool saw, and then the plate to fit the EZ rail system???

    I do not know much about the EZ system, it looks good, but like I said, for me the real heart of the whole guided rail system, is the saw, and beating the Festool TS-55 is not easy thing.

    Good luck with it!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,323
    I voted for the Festool, but:

    I have the EZ, and it's a very good system. My reason for voting Festool is the 'plunge' feature on their saw, and its riving knife - features not available on other saws.

    One other point: Your combined price for the EZ system seems pretty high. A 114" EZ system is $254.00. That means you're allowing $300.00 for a saw. My Makita saw was only a bit over $100. PC or DeWalt saws can be had for around $150, so the total for the EZ system should realistically be more like $400.00.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
    Posts
    5,533
    Old School all the way. you Can do the job and have more money for turning tools or simply materials with the basics as the newer snazzier items.
    -Ned

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719
    I'm with Ned, but I voted for just getting turning tools.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    North Central Texas - DFW
    Posts
    89
    Bill,

    I voted for the Festool. If money is not the constraint, then I believe that the Festool has a good mix of features that are not available on any other setup. The riving knife, plunge, dust collection you just will not find that in any other circular saw. That is not to say that there is anything wrong with the EZ system. Until I can justify a Festool, I will be sticking with my old cutting guide, and dumpy old circular saw.

    Mike

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Constantine, MI
    Posts
    7,892
    If money is not an issue (can't believe I'm saying that), go with the Festool.
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    www.wrworkshop.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,383
    don't you already have a good tablesaw??

    When I break down sheet goods I do one of two things: I have the store make the first cut -- cutting it wide by a 1/4" or more. Or I cut it in the garage with a jigsaw or circular saw -- again, cutting it wide. Then I do the final cuts on the tablesaw.

    Sure, the festool is night, and I know it works great. But I can already get done what it does in other ways - maybe slower, maybe dustier, and maybe not even as easy, but I can still do it.

    My point is that I have other things I'd rather have. Now, if I already had every possible tool, then I might go for the Festool

    ...art (just being contrary)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Art Mulder View Post
    don't you already have a good tablesaw??

    When I break down sheet goods I do one of two things: I have the store make the first cut -- cutting it wide by a 1/4" or more. Or I cut it in the garage with a jigsaw or circular saw -- again, cutting it wide. Then I do the final cuts on the tablesaw.

    Sure, the festool is night, and I know it works great. But I can already get done what it does in other ways - maybe slower, maybe dustier, and maybe not even as easy, but I can still do it.

    My point is that I have other things I'd rather have. Now, if I already had every possible tool, then I might go for the Festool

    ...art (just being contrary)
    Well Art, don't you have a half decent handsaw? I mean you could dump your circular saw and jigsaw, also it makes less noise, better for your health, all that upper body work. I know it would be harder and not as accurate, but you could get it done............ right

    Stuart (just being even MORE contrary)

    All funning aside, sure, you are correct Art, I did much the same thing for a long time, but, once I got the Festool, my personal satisfaction level working with sheet goods rose to a whole new level. I used to dread having to break down a bunch of sheets of plywood for a project, but no more, now it is a fairly easy operation and very much dust free. It is also a lot quicker, not having to cut everything twice, and more important, with half the number of cuts to be made, I have less chances to screw up the measurements

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    470
    I've owned both. I vote for Festool.

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