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Thread: 16" jointer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Winchester Ky.
    Posts
    98

    16" jointer

    I just returned from picking up my latest purchase. A 16" jointer made in Cinn Ohio around 1918 by F.A. JAY Mfg. Company. Is actually in pretty good shape. A little cleaning,adjusting, painting and installing a motor and it will be ready to go. Finally I will be able to square up 10" and 12 ' boards. I currently have a delta 8" jointer. It is babbit bearings but they are in great shape. I was expecting to have to repour the babbit bearings or retrofit them with ball bearings. Which would be hard to do due to the way it was made but no need now. Cant wait to get it running !

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    1,099
    That's a bigin'!

    Nice score. Keep us posted with your referb.
    "I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a
    friend...if you have one."
    --George Bernard Shaw to Winston Churchill

    "Cannot possibly attend first night, will attend second..if there is
    one."
    --Winston Churchill, in response




  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    4,268
    Look out guys! There are two of us now!!

    My jointer

    Ken, great find. Your going to LOVE having a big jointer!!
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Winchester Ky.
    Posts
    98
    Jeff I just finished looking at your jointer. Great job you did on retro. I havent took mine apart yet. Probably will start tomorrow night after work hugggg!!! I havent seen that type of babbitt bearings yours had. (thrust) Cant wait to see mine. I am lucky that mine has a round cutter head even if it only has two blades. I guess I will leave them that way. Just wondering a couple of things? Do you still have and use yours. If so how well is it doing for you? What rpm are you running the cutter head. By the way I liked the vintage motor you used. I assume it was an 1800 rpm. It looked like you was running 6" to 3" pulleys? Any suggestions before I get started? I will post pictures of the process if you want.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    4,268
    OH yea, I still have it. No intentions of letting that one go!! I use it regular. I have a 6" long bed that is single phase. So it gets used a lot of smaller stuff since I don't have to fire up the phase converter. Any face jointing of any size goes across it.

    I am not getting the finish off mine I would like. It leaves some minor scallops but it cuts the board flat and thats the main thing. Being an old square head I am not convinced I have the blades set exactly right. I can't index off the head to find TDC with an indicator. I am still looking for the best method to set the blade height. I may be cutting with 1 blade?

    I too assume that old motor is 1750 RPM. I don't have a tachometer but I know it's not 3000+ RPM motor. The motor came off a Greeves Cluesman 12" jointer with a similar size pulley so I knew it was close to what it needs to be. But thats another thing I need to check. It may be running too slow and that would explain the surface I get. Just haven't found a tachometer to check it with yet.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  6. #6
    I thought the cutter speed on these things was around 2000 rpm? That was what the old timers generally tried to gear their leather belt machines too anyway: Anyway that was the rpm speed I was headed for whether I power it with a electric motor, or power it the pto on my tractor. with a dunno:

    I am not familiar with square head cutter heads Jeff, but it would seem to me you could still use a dial indicator to ensure all your cutting edges are an equal distance from the centerline of the square head block? Assuming there is no discernible play in your babbitt bearings, you could use the diameter of those bearings as your centerline? At the same time, a rotating square flying through space makes a circle. Once you figure out what that radius is, you merely have to adjust your cutting edge so it extends the same amount. I know maybe easier said then done?

    I would think a magnetic base with a rigid arm to hold the dial indicator would come into use here. You really are not trying to get any real measurement, but really just want to make sure the two blades are set at the same pareellel height with the tables. Well assuming that distance doesnot take toomuch ofa bite out of your wood. Since you say the board is flat, you have got to be close.

    I am not criticizing you at all here Jeff, just trying to figure something out that works. The problem is I am not familiar with square heads and can only picture my machine which may be somewhat different then yours.

    Still I love these threads. It gives me a kick in the butt to get mine rebuilt. I see Travers has their A2 tool steel on sale this month so that I can get cutting some new edges machined out. Other then finding a five horse single phase electric motor to power this thing, or some unique tractor pto gearing, I'll be golden. (Like that is going to happen)
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  7. #7
    Ken, I am not sure if this helps or not, but I have a webpage on my website dedicated to the rebuild of my jointer. Its quite different from the model you and Jeff have, but the babbitt bearings are unique as well. Whoever did them, dis so in 1938 and used a felt type wick at the bottom of the babbit bearing. This was cast right in, so when you oil the bearings, the oil pools at the bottom of the bearing and acts as a felt wiper, adding oil to the shaft where it bears down the most. I thought that was kind of cool.

    My jointer is a touch bigger then yours at 18 inches,but was in roughly the same shape. Everything appeared to be seized up, but a bit of wd-40, some never-seize and a bit or persuasion here and there and the thing was fixed up. I did add some paint, but regret that now. White paint just does not look good on this aircraft carrier

    I still have to power it somehow, either by pto shaft from my tractor (mid-sized Kubota) or an electrical motor. The most important thing right now though is machining out some new knives for it. The old set were ground back into the gib bolt slots. Way to much power on those knives for this guy to be around when the thing is whirling at 2000 rpm.

    Anyway here is the webpage in case you are interested. You certainly picked up a great machine, and came to a great place to talk about it. There are some real good old iron buffs on here that you can really get some good information from. (Jeff, Paul, Stu and many others...)

    18 inch Jointer Webpage
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Winchester Ky.
    Posts
    98

    rpm

    Jeff what size are the two pulleys that you are using. The new machines are running around 5000 rpm. I am not sure if the babbitt can handle that due to heat buildup?
    Correct me if I am missing something here but I thought you would set the blades with a magnetic base dial indicator set on the table to ensure the blades were parallel to the table??

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    4,268
    I try to answer both you at once. Yes I typicaly use a dial indicator. On my round head I just to to one end, slid it across the head till Ifind the high point, Top Dead Center. The I can lock it in place and rotate the head and check he knife height to the table.

    Problem with a square head is finding TDC since the thing isn't round. (Travis, it's basically a square block with knives bolted on two sides) You can do it but it would take forever. Since you would have to move the base and rotate the head. Note the reading, move the base, rotate the head and note the reading. Repeating this till you found the highest point. I can't just slide the indicator it over the head to find the highest point as you can with a round head.

    Now if I could lock the head in place. Set the blades, then rotate it 180 degree and lock it, it would be simple. Wouldn't matter where TDC was. But I have no way of doing that either. I use the straight edge method and a lot of trial and error. I have read about a stick method that I am going to try. Need to sharpen the blades again before long.

    As for cutter speeds your looking for Surface Feet per Minute. Also have to be careful on these not to go two fast so they don't sling a knife out. They are just held in with 4 bolts. No wedge locks.

    Here is a useful link. http://www.owwm.com/math/default.aspx
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cedar Park, TX
    Posts
    320
    Man, dat's an aircraft carrier!!!
    Jerry

    http://www.sawdustersplace.com

    "If politics wasn't built on careful deception it wouldn't need its own word and techniques. It would just be called honesty, education, and leadership."
    Bob "Phydeaux" Stewart one day on Woodnet

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