Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Making Sawdust, Reducing Scrap Pile

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Jay, Maine
    Posts
    120

    Exclamation Making Sawdust, Reducing Scrap Pile

    What a frustrating day!

    As I may have mentioned, I am in the beginning stages of making a 5"x7"x4" maple box to store the ashes of our dog who we had to have laid away a couple of weeks ago. The box will have edge miters with reinforcing keys.

    Today, I decided to get my table saw all set up to cut true. Yeah, right!!! Spent a couple of hours this morning trying to adjust the miter gauge to be square to the blade/miter slot. First it would be off in one direction, I'd make another test cut, without any adjustment, and it would be correct, then with another cut - off in the other direction. There is a tiny bit of side-to-side slop, but I would guess it is less an 1/128". Just don't know - maybe I'm trying to be too precise. I have come to the conclusion that I definitely need an aftermarket miter gauge, but don't have the $$$ for it at this time. Finally got it close (as in just a smidgeon of light showing when I check it with a square). I'm sure it will be different the first time I test it tomorrow.

    So then this afternoon I tried to set the 90 and 45 deg miter stops for a true 90/45 degrees. The 90 deg stop only took a couple of cuts. However the 45 deg. stop was another exercise in futility. Well, not quite but it sure seemed that way for a while. I must have cut 8 ft. of scraps (MDF, dimensional lumber) before I got it real close. Oh, for a digital angle gauge!!!

    Anyone need a bucket of 1-3-inch scraps for the stove?

    Just before I came back upstairs from the shop, I heard a "sprang" from the table saw. Hmmmm, bet it isn't cutting 45 deg. when I check it again tomorrow morning before I start cutting the edge miters on the box.

    Anyway, another day in the life....

    Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Riverview, FL
    Posts
    7
    Jim sorry to hear about your woes. Was wondering what kind of a table saw you are having this much frustration with? Not that I have tried to do anything that requires the precision of a keyed miter joint, but my Dewalt 744 contractor saw is "fairly" accurate, despite it's lack of distinct controls for height and angle.

    Carl

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Jay, Maine
    Posts
    120
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Brothers View Post
    Jim sorry to hear about your woes. Was wondering what kind of a table saw you are having this much frustration with? Not that I have tried to do anything that requires the precision of a keyed miter joint, but my Dewalt 744 contractor saw is "fairly" accurate, despite it's lack of distinct controls for height and angle.

    Carl
    I have a Craftsman JobSite saw. It is really a nice saw, but wow, what a pain to setup. What I actually think is that it is not intended to the precision that I am attempting to achieve - on a jobsite a 45 deg angle will probably work anywhere between 44.5 and 45.5 and that wouldn't be too difficult to set. But I must say that the combination blade height/angle wheel, when attempting to set the angle, is not what I would call a precision adjustment. I could have accomplished what took me all day in about 5 minutes if I had one of those digital angle gauges. Sometimes being retired with limited resources is so frustrating - most of my retirement check goes to pay for fuel oil!!!

    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Odessa, Tx
    Posts
    1,813
    Jim, it's fairly simple to take the "Slop" out of your mitre guage, (if the slop is in the mitre slot/guide). Just take a pointed metal punch and a hammer and make dents in the "Side" of the guide rail about every two inches along one side. This will make little round raised spots along that side and tighten the rail in the slot.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jim crockett View Post
    Sometimes being retired with limited resources is so frustrating - most of my retirement check goes to pay for fuel oil!!!

    Jim
    Oh I feel your pain, its the same way with us 33 year old working folks too. They say in Boston the price of fuel oil is 4.10 a gallon. No matter, as a youngster with a baby, I am working on an invention to convert soiled diapers into burnable heatfor my house. I got plenty of them
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Johnson View Post
    Oh I feel your pain, its the same way with us 33 year old working folks too. They say in Boston the price of fuel oil is 4.10 a gallon. No matter, as a youngster with a baby, I am working on an invention to convert soiled diapers into burnable heatfor my house. I got plenty of them
    I got a delivery today in Central MA and it was 3.699, so I'm interested in this baby poo conversion device.

  7. #7
    Jim...

    What kind of saw are you using?

    One thing you might think about is making a sled...one that rides in both miter slots. I'm sure there are many photos around the internet, but it's not difficult and very effective. Piece of mdf or birch ply with hardwood runners and a fence. This design is good for small pieces because you only run the sled far enough into the blade to make the cut...not all the way through (obviously, or you'd cut the sled in half). Using both slots helps it run true, and of course you're making the runners so you can make them as tight as you want. You will use this jig often.

    If you want to stick with the original miter gauge you probably are going to have to modify it. One design that's out there has a couple of threaded holes on the side of the bar for set screws. You could do that if you have a drill press with a vise or some way to hold the bar while drilling. This design avoids doing anything to the slot itself. Just run the set screws out until they ride against the side of the slot. The aftermarket miter gauge that you buy will have some variation of this solution anyway.

    Getting four mitered corners to fit nice and tight is tricky business, and doesn't really have room for slop. Make sure the miter slot is parallel to the blade, that the blade runs true (a slight amount of wobble can affect the profile of the cut), and that the opposite sides of the piece are the same length (a stop is required here). Problems with any of these will show up as gaps in the assembly.

    Cheers.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,471

    router to the rescue???

    they do make a locking mitre bit for the router table that would eliminate your adjustment troubles on the table saw.. just a thought
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  9. #9
    Interesting thought, Larry. That occurred to me, too, but of course assumes there's a router table available. Might be a reason to convince the boss that a router table is an absolute necessity.

    Cheers.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Jay, Maine
    Posts
    120
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Gerhard View Post
    Jim...

    What kind of saw are you using?

    One thing you might think about is making a sled...one that rides in both miter slots. I'm sure there are many photos around the internet, but it's not difficult and very effective. Piece of mdf or birch ply with hardwood runners and a fence. This design is good for small pieces because you only run the sled far enough into the blade to make the cut...not all the way through (obviously, or you'd cut the sled in half). Using both slots helps it run true, and of course you're making the runners so you can make them as tight as you want. You will use this jig often.

    If you want to stick with the original miter gauge you probably are going to have to modify it. One design that's out there has a couple of threaded holes on the side of the bar for set screws. You could do that if you have a drill press with a vise or some way to hold the bar while drilling. This design avoids doing anything to the slot itself. Just run the set screws out until they ride against the side of the slot. The aftermarket miter gauge that you buy will have some variation of this solution anyway.

    Getting four mitered corners to fit nice and tight is tricky business, and doesn't really have room for slop. Make sure the miter slot is parallel to the blade, that the blade runs true (a slight amount of wobble can affect the profile of the cut), and that the opposite sides of the piece are the same length (a stop is required here). Problems with any of these will show up as gaps in the assembly.

    Cheers.
    Great minds must think alike – I began constructing a dedicated 45 deg miter sled this afternoon with dual runners.

    I have a Craftsman 21830 Job-Site Table Saw. Because of its design, my original throat plate is only 3/16” thick (there is a 7/16” piece of round bar stock running the length of the throat, and it doesn’t move as the blade goes up & down). I have been using 1/4” hardboard and still have to cut a 3/32” dado to clear this support. And, when my blade is cranked to 45 deg, it stands proud of the tabletop by about 3/8”. So there was no way I was going to be able to lower the insert over the blade.

    My other thought was to use a piece of 1/2” stock atop the throat opening, tape the insert plate to that sacrificial stock, and raise the blade through both pieces; the only problem I foresaw with this was determining the offset for the insert due to the height above the tabletop.

    I decided that if I was going to go to all of this effort to create a slot in a zci, I might just as well construct a sled. Also, my miter gauge is flaky, so this will solve both problems. I made it 12” x 24” because all I will use it for is box sides and that will be sufficiently large. Luckily, I had a piece of scrap maple long enough to make the runners which I cut this afternoon and sanded down this evening – they fit the slots real nice now. I’ll post a picture after I finish it – hopefully tomorrow.

    Thanks, everyone. Appreciate all of the suggestions and discussion.

    Jim

Similar Threads

  1. Making bakelite: Can I mix sawdust and resin?
    By Joseph Shaul in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-22-2010, 05:11 AM
  2. Wood Pile Update
    By Dan Mosley in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-27-2009, 09:58 PM
  3. Making sawdust
    By Robert Mickley in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-20-2007, 08:28 PM
  4. Big Pile of USED Bessey clamps...........
    By Stuart Ablett in forum New Tools
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-07-2007, 06:47 PM
  5. Burn pile salvage...
    By Ned Bulken in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-03-2007, 12:58 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •