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Thread: how to cut bar moulding?

  1. #1
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    how to cut bar moulding?

    I thought I posted this question, maybe it was removed, so Ill try once again.
    OUtdoor bar, Im using oak plywood(yes, I know its a no no, but with 8-10 coats of spar varnish, it held up fine for 2 years, redoing it again)
    anyway, I dont have an extensive set of router bits, newcomer and all, but I think with basic roundover, cove and rabbitting bit, I can do some sort of decent bar moulding. I have some leftover oak, another no no, but it wil be varnished also, and it just looks so good stained.
    Any tricks or clues on how I should proceed to cut this.
    The stock is 3/4" x 3 inch. (I can glue up 2 pieces if I need too)


    and if any of the experts read this, Id like to ask another quesiton about routers here.
    I have a dewalt router, cant recall the model offhand, its the one that comes in with the 3 bases, plunge router base, stationary, and pistol grip, in a set. Regardless, after owning it for approx one year, it stopped working, and to start up with dewalt wasnt worth it. I brought it locally and had it repaired. Cost me 90 something bucks.
    I was informed I shouldnt use an extension cord, when using a router? Why is this?(wasnt the cause of the damage, since I never used one)
    Last edited by allen levine; 03-26-2008 at 01:08 PM.

  2. #2
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    what are you asking? if you`re looking for profile suggestions it`s kinda hard not knowing what cutters you have?
    can you draw a picture of a moulding cross section?
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
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    Ive only looked at pictures online, of bar mouldning shapes, and I thought that if I practiced a bit with a cove bit and rounderover bit I could form a similar shape, and then rabit out a half inch or so and attach it to the bar top.
    I have I believe a 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 rounderover bits, and 2 cove bits, rabitting is adjustable.
    http://www.bairdbrothers.com/mm5/gra...1/B005-OAK.jpg


    does this help, anything close or similar will do, this is an outdoor tiki bar, gets tons of use, rugged, so beauty isnt the main issue, but Id like the moulding to at least decorate it a bit, beats the rounded over ply edges

    Im not hiding the fact that Im a beginner, and my hands on router experience is very limited.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tiki 174 (Medium).jpg  
    Last edited by allen levine; 03-28-2008 at 08:35 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    ...I was informed I shouldn't use an extension cord, when using a router? Why is this?(wasn't the cause of the damage, since I never used one)
    The answer to whether or not to use an extension cord is --- It depends!

    A long extension cord, made of a low current carrying capacity wire (higher wire guage number) can cause excessive voltage drop, which in turn can mean that the current goes up (causes heat). The higher current means the router runs hotter, and is working harder so it leads to premature failure.

    Another factor is the overall length of the extension cord. Longer cords mean greater voltage drops, so use a heavy duty cord that's as short as practical for the job at hand.

    That said, as long as your extension cord is of good quality, and made from a wire guage that's at least as big - preferably bigger than - the power cord on the router itself, you should be okay.

    Personally, I try to position my work so as to not need any extension cords, but that can't always be done, so I have several 12 gauge extension cords on hand for when I absolutely have to take the tool to the job instead of bringing the job to the tool.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  5. #5
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    the repair service told me the dewalt router is not a good machine.
    I believe he suggested my next purchase should be a makita router.
    He called any ryobi tool a disposable, and laughed at me when I brought my bosch planer in when I accidently got the cord stuck in the blade and shredded it. I keep him busy at least.

  6. #6
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    allen, when i make mouldings i`ll draw a box on paper the size of my stock (say 3/4x3") then draw the profile in the box, next hold up your cutters and determine how the stock will have to be run past the cutters in order to get the profile you`re looking for.
    or in the case of the moulding you link to you could spend a couple bucks a foot and save the labor?
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    allen, when i make mouldings i`ll draw a box on paper the size of my stock (say 3/4x3") then draw the profile in the box, next hold up your cutters and determine how the stock will have to be run past the cutters in order to get the profile you`re looking for.
    or in the case of the moulding you link to you could spend a couple bucks a foot and save the labor?
    I was thinking of just using some old cheap pine cutoffs and playing around as long as it took, just keep flipping the boards, using the cutters as I thought the shape needed.

    I really enjoy the labor, my time playing with wood is what its all about for me, not nearly anything like the talent Ive seen here, but the personal satisfaction I get out of actually creating something I want, or can save money on, like mouldings is worth any time I put in.
    Id rather not go for mouldings, its like a luxury for an outdoor bar that is 2 years old, and I recut, Im even using the same cut frame fromthe roof and counter top, sort of gives me a drop of pride knowing I didnt have to spend more money to make something look nicer.
    I like the idea, Ill draw something and give it a shot, Ill try to post a pic of the cuts on the pine cutoffs, Ill write down each time I use which cutter so Ill remember the sequence if I like the outcome.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    Ive only looked at pictures online, of bar mouldning shapes, and I thought that if I practiced a bit with a cove bit and rounderover bit I could form a similar shape, and then rabit out a half inch or so and attach it to the bar top.
    I have I believe a 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 rounderover bits, and 2 cove bits, rabitting is adjustable.
    http://www.bairdbrothers.com/mm5/gra...1/B005-OAK.jpg


    does this help, anything close or similar will do, this is an outdoor tiki bar, gets tons of use, rugged, so beauty isnt the main issue, but Id like the moulding to at least decorate it a bit, beats the rounded over ply edges

    Im not hiding the fact that Im a beginner, and my hands on router experience is very limited.

    A LESSON IN FUTILITY!!!!!


    The router table I borrow, moved, my contractor neighbor gave it to his associates to keep at their homes, which are just too far for me to run the few times I need the table.

    So I decided either play around with the moulding, give it a shot, or leave it out.(the original bartop doesnt have moulding)

    I finally surrendered to my total lack of talent.
    I fought for 5 hours, skipped lunch,(not that this is a bad thing, I could stand to skip alot of lunches), and decided Im a moron when it comes to this kind of thing, and just decided simple is best.
    Keep it simple stupid, always good advice for me and wood.
    Im not even ashamed of posting how simple my moulding will have to be. It works, does the trick, Ill stain it up, vanish it, and whenever I look at it, Ill remember if I havent purchased my own router table by then, its certainly time.
    No laughing please.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tiki 174 (Medium).jpg  

  9. #9
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    Don't kick yourself too hard, Alan. The molding looks perfect for the application you have in mind. No laughing necessary...most of us have gone through (or are still going through) the same learning curve.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  10. #10
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    Alan,

    I'm still going through the learning curve. One thing I learned: you can't make good moulding without a router table (or a shaper). Trying to do it with a hand held router just isn't worth it...

    But building your own router table is fun and rewarding. Trust me, I've made three so far! They get better each time...

    Thanks,

    Bill

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