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Thread: who makes this router?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Lived in Michigan until I retired in Mexico. Build furniture for use. If I need it I build it.
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    who makes this router?

    Just recently purchased this router from "Truper" in Mexico, Truper is a large hardware distributor and almost every little city has at least one dealer. I paid $1800.00 (pesos) for this one. That's around $170 US dollars. As far as I know Truper does not make any of their tools so someone else had to make it. I searched the web, the closest I could find resembling it was a BD model. I like the machine, a little heavy for my bad back, and the plunge lever a little stiff and a trife akward, but I've got used to it, runs really quiet and has plenty of power, maybe I over bought on this. My main problem is the warrantee, instruction and everything is in espanol and my spanish is still limited. Anyone recogize the model, or who makes it?
    Last edited by Gerald Schacht; 11-10-2010 at 12:46 PM.

  2. #2
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    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    Looks like your router was 'Hecho en Mexico.' Truper's website - in English - lists owners manuals, but the only one I could find for your router is in Spanish only. http://www.truper.com/ingles/index.htm
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  3. #3
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    Lived in Michigan until I retired in Mexico. Build furniture for use. If I need it I build it.
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    Thanks for the reply Jim...I access Truper website quite often. Got the manual for it in spanish. I still suppect this is a national brand name router made for Truper with their name on it. The main thing I don't know about it is what speeds to use for say, 1/4' bit in pine plunging down about an inch,, top speed or is that dangerous.

  4. #4
    Gerald

    Most router bits in the 1/4" to 3/4" range are designed to run at high speeds. I am gonna guess that you router has a top speed of 22,000 - 25,000 rpm and you should have no problem running a 1/4" bit at the top speed. You need to reduce speed for larger bits and with some plastics etc.. In truth, the vast majority of the time your router will be happiest at its top speed setting.

    I would be wary of trying to cut a full inch of depth in anything like a single pass. I typically cut to a maximum of about 1/4" of depth at a pass and I suspect that you will get better results if you work in that range. Light passes also make it much easier to control the tool which is always the safer option.

  5. #5
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    I'll second everything Ian has said. I've got a couple variable speed routers, but I've never used any bits bigger than about a 3/4" roundover, so I've never felt the need to slow it down. If I ever run a frame and panel set in the router table, then I'll need to slow it down a bit.

    And yeah, 1" in a single pass sounds like trouble waiting to happen.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
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    I think the rule of thumb for routing pass size is no more than 3/8 square inches of area removed at a time.

    So for a 3/4" bit making a dado, you shouldn't take more than 1/2" at a time.

    This is for safety. A shallower depth of cut may be required for a good finish.

    You can always Google for (Pat Warner Router) to find his site with a whole bunch of useful router info.

    Good luck, and good job finding someplace to ask about safety concerns.

  7. #7
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    Lived in Michigan until I retired in Mexico. Build furniture for use. If I need it I build it.
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    I really appreciate all these replies, I learned very fast not to make a pass very deep, I now use the step adjustment for each pass. It takes 5 steps to go down 7/8". If I skipped a step I really notice the difference in sound and the material removed is much coarser. The router runs at 23,000 rpm's and draws 15A, so I think it has plenty of power. Don't have a router table yet, so I built a jig to cut tenons, (eight at a time) works pretty good, will get some pics and let you all analyze it. Thanks Mark for the google suggestion on Pat Warner Router, will check that out soon. Jerry

    http://gschacht.bootlogic.com

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