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Thread: looking for help in Centerville, TN

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,172

    looking for help in Centerville, TN

    Actually a favor.

    I have a 20 year old well loved lambskin chocolate brown A2 leather bomber jacket that needs to be restored. It is in good shape in that there are no holes, tears or such. The zipper, cuffs and hem are fine. It is just well worn and dried out. I'd like it re-colored and sealed, buffed or whatever they do to make it look great and last.

    I got a lead on a person in that community third hand the presumably does that sort of thing. Just would like to have a better recommendation than a third hand referral from someone I don't know. I trust woodworkers. After all, I are one!

    PM me if you think you can help.

    Or, anyone know where I can get this done? The Internet is riff with conflicting information. Lots of leather furniture restorers, boots, saddles, chaps, motorcycle leathers, and such. But this is soft delicate lambskin. The ones I talked to don't want to do it.

    I am NOT interested in a DIY project. This jacket is too special. It was custom made for me. I shudder to think what replacing it would cost.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ozarks
    Posts
    4,993
    geeze carol.....all i have experience with is riding leathers, horse tack and sporting goods....maybe call a local furrier? i`m bettin` that somebody who deals with mink-n-fox could handle sheepskin.
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,172
    Thanks, Tod. But it is lambskin, not sheep skin. Sheep skin to me is the woolly thick warm stuff of jackets, boot liners, vests, etc. Love it in the winter time. This is the classic smooth leather bomber jacket, not furry at all.

    But when I get to a larger city that might have a furrier, I will go and ask. Hadn't thought of that one. Thanks.
    Last edited by Carol Reed; 04-03-2008 at 12:45 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Wisconsin Dells, WI
    Posts
    485
    Hey Carol. Don't have a solution for you. Just thought I'd say HEY. Been a while. You still in Iowa? Or you back in AZ?

    Karl

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,831
    You said dried out. I do some leather work and know that what is gone is gone and cannot be put back. The best cure is prevention. You can get some softness back with oils. But full restoration just won't happen. The standby is Neatsfoot Oil. In your case, I would suggest the 'compound' type which has silicones added. This would be a messy do-it-yerself job. Just slather the oil all over the coat and let penetrate, then do it again and again until it won't take anymore. Then hang and let excess drip out. You will have to mop out all the wet spots or all your clothes and yourself will be oily and orange from where you touch. I think that will be about the best you can expect. An alternative might be a beeswax protectant but I don't know of any good ones on the market currently. Sno Seal used to be good but has changed and isn't worth the bother anymore, IMHO. I make my own.

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