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Thread: 8" & 4" Tool Rests

  1. #1
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    8" & 4" Tool Rests

    I have two 12" straight tool rests, one that came with the lathe, the stock Nova tool rest.......
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    ....and one I made out of 1" round stock, I use this one for a lot of roughing out, as it is SOLID

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    I also have a 6" tool rest, that came with the lathe, it is from Woodcraft, I think.......(like this, but 6" not 12")

    I've often wanted, or needed an 8" or 4" straight tool rest, so I finally got off my duff and made some

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    Two pieces of steel, a flat bar stock, 8" long, about 2" wide, and 3\8" thick, and one piece of 1" round stock, 6" long.

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    I then cut a notch in the round stock to hold the bar stock......

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    and do some filing to fit the two pieces together, also making sure that the scale is ground off the steel to get good clean welds.

    I then get out the MIG welder, I have it cranked up all the way, and make some sparks!

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    I know the welds are not perfect, but they should do the job.

    I sanded down the steel, rounded over the top edge, and polished it up, I think it worked out well!

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    I also made a 4" tool rest, took just over an hour to do both pieces.

    I bought one 3' length of 1" bar stock for about $5, and the flat stock for about $6, I used up one 4" grinding wheel, maybe $1, and some welding stuff too, so maybe my outlay is about $4 for each tool, plus my time.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    Sep 2007
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    Nice work Stuart, I did the same as you did, only I bolted it with countersink srews. I use this smaller toolrest for getting better access in gaps.

  3. #3
    Nothing like fabricating the stuff you need to get some woodworking done Stu! I admire that in anyone. It also seems that this kind of mentality is gain popularity on FWW.

    I think that is one of the reasons I liked this place so much. I could come on here, describe a self-made tool or jig and no one lamb-basted you for making it when there was a commercial thing available to buy.

    It just seems like lately there is more and more "self-made" creations on here. I am not sure which I am more proud of...FWWers for coming up with so many creative ideas, or the forum for just being so open and casual that it fosters self-creation ideas?
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  4. #4
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    Those look like they'll do the trick indeed. I've probably welded no more than 12 inches of bead in my life, but I see projects like this and I keep thinking I'd sure like to get a decent small welder. Like a hot melt glue gun for steel. I like that idea.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
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    Ad the bolts work too, but for me, a welded on is just so much more solid (as long as my welds hold )

    Travis, yeah, I've always enjoyed making stuff myself, but over here, there is often no real other choice, well besides paying through the nose that is..

    Vaughn, if you get one, make sure you get a 200V unit, the 100V units are too limited, IMHO.

    Hot melt gun for steel, yeah, that about sums it up.

    If you took one of them evening welding classes at a community collage, I'm sure that you would be a better weldor than I am in no time at all.

    I honestly cannot even imagine the money I've saved by being able to do this stuff myself. On even on job, like the >> Beer Shelves << I did for the liquor shop, the price of the steel, and the welder would have still been cheaper than buying those shelves commercially, so yeah, it sure is one useful tool to have around........ I just wish I could afford a Plasma Arc Torch
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Great looking tool rests Stu. I made some to but smaller so I can get my fingers around it to do finials like Cindy does for control. Well done.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Weishapl View Post
    Great looking tool rests Stu. I made some to but smaller so I can get my fingers around it to do finials like Cindy does for control. Well done.
    Thanks Bernie!

    What do you mean by "Smaller"?

    As in the flat bar stock is not 2" wide like on mine, but more like 1" wide?

    I have her DVD coming, can't wait!

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
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    lutefisk capitol, USA
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    Too bad I'm not still at my Old Job. Access to unlimited welding and machining equipment. The rests look good. I plan on firing up my inverter and have a go at some. My plan was for 3/4" round stock for the rest and whatever the post size checks out at. Welding for a living makes me not want to do it too much at home.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Those look like they'll do the trick indeed. I've probably welded no more than 12 inches of bead in my life, but I see projects like this and I keep thinking I'd sure like to get a decent small welder. Like a hot melt glue gun for steel. I like that idea.
    If you get a welder Vaughn, do yourself a favor and get a TIG machine and learn how to tig. It takes a bit of practice but there is nothing like it. From welding aluminum to titanium, only Tig Welding can do all that. It also does the very thin stuff too.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,806
    Yep, TIG is the cats meow, but, it takes serious practice. I know some guys here who weld TIG for motorcycles etc, they do it just often enough to have to practice weekly, even if they are not needing anything welded, just to keep the skills up.

    I've only tried it a few times, but man, you CAN weld coke cans to vending machines (just about!).

    For the home user, I'd still go with a 200V MIG
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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