Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Sharpening a Gouge

  1. #1

    Sharpening a Gouge

    Hi Guys,

    Im just getting into turning (bowls mostly) and am wondering what the best beginner setup is for sharpening a gouge? I don't want to buy a Tormack Wet Grinder or anything like that, I've already got a 6" high speed dry grinder (3400 rpm) that I'm hopping to put a white wheel on ... will this work? Do I need a slower grinder?

    Also, if I am not regrinding the bevel but just sharpening the edge, should I go to the grinder for this? Or should I just hone the edge a bit with a stone?

    Thanks for the all help. I'm getting a lot of different answers on this so trying to clarify things.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Stow, OH
    Posts
    151
    Your 6" high speed grinder should work. As a matter of fact, Oneway, the maker of Wolverine sharpening jig recommends a high speed grinder. High speed removes steel faster; use light touch. 8" wheel would create less of a hollow ground and would have longer service life. They also cost more, so it somewhat evens out.
    Smooth running of the wheels is more important than size or speed of the grinder. You also have to get a wheel dresser to true the wheel and clean the metal that is embedded in the wheel so it won't overheat your tool. Overheat would damage the temper of carbon steel but won't harm HSS.
    With turning, the cutting edge is subject to a lot of abrasion. You need to sharpen your tool often. Sharp tool cuts down on sanding.
    You can find a lot of sharpening information as well as video from here:
    http://www.oneway.ca/multi-media/wolverine_videos.htm
    Gordon

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
    Posts
    4,834
    I will chime in here. I agree with Gordon that speed is not a factor although I like slow speed. I had a 6 inch grinder at 3400 rpm. On certain tools I had trouble get the bevel that I wanted. I could never get the grind just right. After listening to the advice of Mike Mahoney and Ernie Conover I broke down and bought the Woodcraft 8" slow speed with the wolverine jig and haven't looked back. That was the best investment I made. Properly sharpened tools are the key to good turning.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    WNY, Buffalo Area
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by Dawson Mossman View Post
    Hi Guys,

    Im just getting into turning (bowls mostly) and am wondering what the best beginner setup is for sharpening a gouge? I don't want to buy a Tormack Wet Grinder or anything like that, I've already got a 6" high speed dry grinder (3400 rpm) that I'm hopping to put a white wheel on ... will this work? Do I need a slower grinder?

    Also, if I am not regrinding the bevel but just sharpening the edge, should I go to the grinder for this? Or should I just hone the edge a bit with a stone?

    Thanks for the all help. I'm getting a lot of different answers on this so trying to clarify things.
    I'm new to turning myself. I have an 8in high speed Delta grinder with a white 100 grit wheel. I use the Wolverine jig for my gouges (only have 3, roughing, spindle, and 3/8in bowl). It works really well, and it is really quick once you get it set up for the tool you are using. You can see in the bowl gouge in the 1st picture. The 2nd picture shows the bevel of that gouge resting on the wheel at the correct angle. The 3rd picture shows the wolverine 3x5in adjustable plate. Honestly, once you have the arm set for the correct length (to give you the correct bevel), it takes longer for the grinder to get up to speed than it does to sharpen the gouge.

    Hope this helps!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GrinderSetup1.jpg   GrinderSetup2.jpg   GrinderSetup3.jpg  
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Hi Dawson

    If you take a look a this thread, >> Sharpening Demystified << I think you will find a good system for getting your gouges nice and sharp, I use this daily, and I'm very happy with it.

    Make sure you download and red the article by n>> Kirk DeHeer << This is a PDF file.

    Good luck!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Thanks Guys, so if one where getting a new grinder, you would definitely recommend an 8" over a 6"? Also, with a grinder speed of around 3450 rpm, would it be "easy" to burn the edge, or is that not an issue with HSS as long as I'm gentle with the grinding?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Stow, OH
    Posts
    151
    The best buy on new grinder is the slow speed from Woodcraft. They are usually on sale for around $80. They come with two decent white wheels.

    Smooth running is the most important thing. The WC grinders are generally good, but once in awhile there may be a bad one slips the QC. Woodcraft has a good reputation standing behind their products on service and return. If you have to drive a fair distance to buy one, plug the grinder in at the store to see whether it runs smooth before leaving.

    Most other grinders have at least one gray wheel that is not suitable for grinding turning tools.
    Gordon

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    In my opinion, the grinder to "Have" is the Baldor 7" grinder, either the high or the low speed, but they cost real money (would be the last grinder you would ever buy though).

    I have the woodcraft, 8" slow speed grinder, I do not think I'd have a problem with a high speed grinder, but the wheels have to be balanced.

    If I might suggest you buy the WC 8" slow speed grinder, and the Oneway balancing system. The stock wheels that come with the WC slow speed grinder will not work with the Oneway balancing system, but they are not the best quality wheels, so not using them is not a big deal, IMHO.

    If your wheels are NOT balanced, the tool WILL bounce on the wheels, and if the tools bounce, it does not matter which jig system you use, you will NOT get a good consistent grind.

    I'm having great success with the Oneway balancing system, on the WC slowspeed grinder, and my Dungeon made jig system. I recently replaced my Oneway wheels with some Norton 3x wheels, they were a lot cheaper than the Oneway wheels, but are still good. I can easily balance a coin on my grinder when it is running, the grinder runs smoooooooth, so grinding my tools is very easy.

    << Linky Pic
    WC Slow Speed Grinder $95

    << Linky Pic
    Norton 3X 8" wheels #46 #80 $50 each (2x50 -$100)

    << Linky Pic
    Oneway Balancing System for 5/8" arbor $58

    << Linky Pic
    Diamond Wheel Dresser $40

    Total $293, or there abouts.

    << Linky Pic

    Baldor #7306 7x1 wheel, 5/8 shaft 1800 rpm $454 or there about, the wheels on it are really not made for HSS, so you would have to buy those too.

    You could easily break down the purchases, start with the basic grinder, then get the better wheels and the balancing system, but, in my experience, you want the better wheels and the balancing system.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Stow, OH
    Posts
    151
    Stu,

    You are absolutely right. The Baldor is the dream grinder. The wheels that most places carried are either 8" or 6". To me, it doesn't make sense to put a 6" wheel in a 7" Baldor. The price tag on 8" Baldor is a bit too high.

    On my WC grinder, it made funny noise after 2 or 3 years. I replaced it with the heavy duty Delta grinder (the 100 lb model). The Delta runs much smoother than the WC and I have to replace the gray wheel. On my WC white wheel, there is a bushing hidden under the label that I can knock out. It has a 1" hole, so the OW balancer can be used.

    After using the Norton 3X 46 grit, the WC OEM wheels are usable but I won't miss them.

    What I have now is a Delta heavy duty grinder with Norton 80 grit SG wheel on one side and Norton 3X 46 grit with OW balancer on the other side. It runs so smooth and quiet that it takes a long time for the grinder to coast down. I have to look at the switch position to know whether the grinder was actually been turned off.
    I got the SG wheel from CSUSA, you can't use the OW balancer on it. CSUSA claims that the SG wheels that they carry would be so uniform in density that you don't need a balancer.

    IMO, if you are going to replace the wheels anyway, then I would step up on the grinder as well. If you compare the grinder alone, the $200 Delta is a way better built grinder than the WC grinder. It is more than twice the quality.
    http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st...avy_duty?Args=
    I was told this is a better grinder than the Delta variable speed. The VS would warm up after extended usage.
    Gordon

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Gordon, I agree with everything you say

    But,the WC grinder was available here for a reasonable price, the 100 lb Delta grinder would be nice, for sure, but the shipping

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

Similar Threads

  1. Bent my bowl gouge.. a 5/8" bowl gouge
    By Chuck Ellis in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-01-2010, 12:57 PM
  2. Sharpening-Thompson Gouge-Jet Wet grinder
    By Dan Mosley in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-11-2009, 12:51 AM
  3. Now that's a gouge!
    By Jeff Bower in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-11-2007, 03:47 PM
  4. where to buy a gouge
    By Ned Bulken in forum Neander Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-14-2007, 07:30 PM
  5. Sharpening bowl gouge on the cheap
    By Dario Octaviano in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-31-2007, 07:57 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •