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Thread: Check out this House Truck

  1. #1
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    Check out this House Truck

    Woodworking and camping, gotta love it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLE9L7x1zew
    -Ned

  2. #2
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    Interesting. That unit has to be extremly heavy and gas milage really lousy. Bet he doesn't travel very far. Unlikely that truck is a comfortable ride either. Still, interesting.

  3. #3
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    Frank...he lives in Covington, WA....he don't have to go far to be in awesome camping country....ocean or mountains just a handful of miles away!

    Neat camping rig...probably outlast any of the commercial units being build...and not a Festool in sight!

    Doug

  4. #4
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    If I didn't KNOW, (not think KNOW) That I'd a) go broke in a hurry, and b) give the DW grounds for immediate divorce, I would Love to convert a Skoolie. (school bus into camper) and c) have to finish the shop....
    I'd do something similar. IF and when the LOML and I migrate to warmer climates, I'll be looking for a good solid chassis somewhere and doing just that.
    -Ned

  5. #5
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    Yeah Ned, this is really something for a retired guy like me, but where can I find my workshop. Saw something like this before, but than with a workshop in the back, even with two bikes stored somewhere below the floor level.
    What is a Dutchman without a bike? Well completely helpless.
    Ad

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    Interesting. That unit has to be extremly heavy......
    Agree -- Wonder if he has thought about how he is going to stop that thing once he gets it moving? Especially coming down a mountain!

    Glad he lives on the other side of the country!

    Tony, BCE '75

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    If I didn't KNOW, (not think KNOW) That I'd a) go broke in a hurry, and b) give the DW grounds for immediate divorce, I would Love to convert a Skoolie. (school bus into camper) ...
    Ned, I seem to remember you mentioning that you were pretty tall?

    I used to live in Edmonton, and there was a fellow there in my church who had converted a school bus into a camper. However, he was also pretty tall, about 6'5" if I recall correctly. So he had sold off that bus and instead bought a surplus/used Military bus. It looked just like a school bus, but the roof was a good 10-12" taller, so he could now stand up inside the thing without banging his head. It was also a bit longer than his older bus (which had been a shorter school bus) so it'd fit his family better.

    I left Edmonton 9 years ago, and sometimes I wonder how that project of his turned out. (It was about half to 3/4 done when we left. )

    Oh, and I agree with the other guys on weight. I love working wood, but this is one situation where I think aluminum and stuff like that would make more sense. I also would worry about safety. Just how solid is something like this?

    ...art

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Mulder View Post
    Ned, I seem to remember you mentioning that you were pretty tall?

    I used to live in Edmonton, and there was a fellow there in my church who had converted a school bus into a camper. However, he was also pretty tall, about 6'5" if I recall correctly. So he had sold off that bus and instead bought a surplus/used Military bus. It looked just like a school bus, but the roof was a good 10-12" taller, so he could now stand up inside the thing without banging his head. It was also a bit longer than his older bus (which had been a shorter school bus) so it'd fit his family better.

    I left Edmonton 9 years ago, and sometimes I wonder how that project of his turned out. (It was about half to 3/4 done when we left. )

    Oh, and I agree with the other guys on weight. I love working wood, but this is one situation where I think aluminum and stuff like that would make more sense. I also would worry about safety. Just how solid is something like this?

    ...art

    Military bus, cool idea, if I can find one. However, there are loads of skoolies with lifted roofs. I'll just have to take a course in welding, buy a few hi-lift jacks and a little square stock and a standard bus can get taller wtih some effort, but not unreasonable effort.
    -Ned

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    a standard bus can get taller with some effort, but not unreasonable effort.

    hah!

    After posting, I spent my "veg" time googling for "bus camper conversion" and read 3 or 4 stories that people posted about their experiences converting a bus to an RV.

    Not one took less than a year. Heck, most were 2+ years.

    That's quite a lot of effort!

    I like this guys work: http://www.vonslatt.com/ He is a scrounger among scroungers. And the end result was a very nice fit and finish. Classy old colour scheme (interior) at the end as well.

    This one was cool also: http://homepage.mac.com/rbumann/eagle/Alotta.htm It was what I'd call a "greyhound-style" bus, though. And they raised the roof on it. What was interesting about this is that this couple included a small workshop in the back of the bus for their scrollsawing. They don't talk about it much at all in the story, but it is there in the plans and photos.

    And this one: http://seanf.smugmug.com/Bus%20Conversion It's another flat-nosed school bus conversion, and this one really drove home to me the huge amount of work involved. The Vonslatt guy above was very can-do in his blog, and made it look easy. This guy shows all the effort -- 2 years and it doesn't look like he's done yet.

    oh well. On the upside, as the scrollsawing couple illustrated, by doing it yourself you get to build it the way YOU want it. Also I note that all of these involve a full-size shower, instead of those tiny tiny things that you see in commercial RVs. So another thing that DIY gives you is some comfort tweaks.

    Not to worry, it's nothing I'll ever be attempting - I live on a city lot, and there just ain't no room for something like that!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Falotico View Post
    Agree -- Wonder if he has thought about how he is going to stop that thing once he gets it moving? Especially coming down a mountain!

    Glad he lives on the other side of the country!
    And with a 50+ year old braking system.

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