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Thread: Hello

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    We now divide our time between southwest Florida and southwest Vermont.
    Posts
    137

    Hello

    I am a new member about to assemble a workshop in our southwest Vermont basement, after a long layoff from woodworking. My current list includes a Bosch 4100 table saw, Bosch 1617evspk router with a Bosch table, Makita 10" sliding compound miter saw, Kreg pocket hole set, P-C dovetail jig, and an assortment of clamps,squares,and alignment tools. Maybe a biscuit cutter and drill press, but initially no planer or jointer or fixed sanders. I like what I read about PSI dust collection units, but more thought needs to be given to that issue.

    We're new to Vermont (bought last June) and I'd appreciate any referrals for supplies, groups, etc. Also, if anyone has had problems with any items on my wish list, please let me know. Thanks.
    The optimist says the glass is half full.
    The pessimist says it's half empty.
    I say the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,077
    Welcome Tony. You will find no shortage of advice here. The "correctness" of your choice in tools will depend on:
    1. What you are planning to do or make.
    2. The space you have to do it in.
    3. Your own preference.

    Now, understanding that most information is tainted with the provider’s viewpoint let the games begin ;-)

    If you are going to make items using solid wood and do not want to be limited to what the store has to offer, a jointer and planer will be essential. If you are going to be primarily using sheet goods and veneers it will be easier to get by without tools to flatten solid materials.

    You will hear many folks say that if they were to do it again, their dust collection system would be one of the first purchases, not a purchase further down the line. Dad has a 2HP PSI single stage and it really has some pull. If you go the single stage route this is a good priced unit. I run a 1HP Delta and it is good for one (and only one) machine at a time but it is definitely on my short list of upgrades due to its lack of power.

    My brother has the Bosch (an older model) and it is one of the finest jobsite saws I have seen. I'll assume you need to fold it up and put it away when it is not in use and given this challenge you have made a good choice. The 4100-09 has a great guard system but does push into the price range of a contractor's saw.

    If you are going to leave the saw set up I would spend the money you are paying for that well designed folding leg system and put it into a different type of saw. A contractor's saw would get you away from the universal motor, give you a larger table surface and (potentially) a better fence or the ability to mount one. However, the fold up and put away option goes out the window.

    This is a good place to pause and say that all this info is free and worth every penny. I may mention something or recommend a tool that has nothing to do with what you want to do in your shop ;-) Just take anything that may be useful here and chuck the rest.

    On the DP, a floor unit takes up about the same space as a benchtop and there is no comparison. Your small router table and dovetail jig call for a good bench but I don’t see it on your list. IMHO a bench is as important as any other tool and should not be short changed.

    The sliding CMS will help with all that molding that you must be planning. If you are not planning on a lot of that sort of work (kitchen remodel, crown molding in the formal dining room, etc.) you could direct that money elsewhere. I have a small CMS and it is great for when it is needed. It does not replace the TS for accurate miters, crosscuts and such. I would not want to be without it but, if I were starting out again, it would be farther down on the list.

    I must have had too much coffee this morning. I am really rambling on. In a nutshell, I (and this has nothing to do with you) would start from scratch like this (the first few items could come in any order):

    1. Cyclone
    2. Table saw or Band saw
    3. Jointer
    4. Planer
    5. Router(s) and table
    6. Workbench
    7. DP
    8. Marking and measuring
    9. Clamps
    10. etc., etc., etc.

    It is so hard to place the first few items in any kind of order. Lighting and electrical could come first, for example. Many of these things will depend on your space, what you want to do in it and how you want to achieve it. Who knows, you may go Neander or slip over to the darkside of the Spinny world. Above all have fun and enjoy it.

    Last edited by glenn bradley; 04-13-2008 at 02:40 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    We now divide our time between southwest Florida and southwest Vermont.
    Posts
    137

    Thanks

    Thanks, Glenn.

    We're going up north in two weeks, when the ordering will begin. The DC system will be the first permanent installation; I just have to pick one. At this point, I'm leaning towards PSI DC2V2, but I may be able to use something a bit smaller. The prior owner built two benches which I will evaluate and replace or improve as needed.

    My first project will include flooring and base trim, and I think the Makita will be set up in the garage for a while before it goes down to the shop room. I anticipate using mostly good veneer plywood for cases initially, and there is a local shop where I can get solid wood planed down if I need it.

    Your point about the table saw is well taken. I have enough room for a fixed saw with belt drive, but I didn't want to spend as much as they cost. I started out looking at less expensive worksite units like the DeWalt and Ridgid units, and initially settled on the Bosch 4000, which can be had for under $500. Then I looked at the 4100, and price creep caught up with me. I'll think it over again.

    Thanks for your good input. Tony
    The optimist says the glass is half full.
    The pessimist says it's half empty.
    I say the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,464
    Welcome to the family Tony!
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Posts
    1,417
    Welcome, Tony. We're glad to have you. We love pics, so please keep us updated on your shop "furnishing."

    Nancy
    Nancy Laird
    dandnspecialties@msn.com
    FWW Registered Voter and Voting Member
    Woodworker, turner, laser engraver; RETIRED!!


    A veteran is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to his country for an amount of 'up to and including my life.' If you love your country, thank a vet.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    613
    Wellcome to the club Tony.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719
    Welcome to the family Tony!
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,077
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Maio View Post
    Then I looked at the 4100, and price creep caught up with me. I'll think it over again.
    Ah, price creep . . . my arch enemy. The voices in my head go something like "but for only $xx.xx more you could have this". that's kinda why I mentioned a fixed base saw unless there was a driving need for a fold up. Once you break that $500 barrier your choices open up a bit. Then they open up again over $1000. Been through that internal argument as well .

    Despite many folks best intentions and good information I still cut corners on a couple items. I have since replaced them with usable ones and of course the cost of buying an "almost" machine first still stings. On the other hand, there a lot of tools I don't have because I either don't have the cash or I can't really qualify my desire to get a (insert tool here) .

    The CMS will definitly pull its own weight in doing any kind of trim work so that makes good sense. Sounds like you've got a fun project or two ahead. Enjoy!
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  9. #9
    Don Taylor is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,289
    Hi Tony!

    Welcome to the family

    DT

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inside the Beltway
    Posts
    2,666
    Tony,

    First, where in Vermont? (we have family up there, near Mt Ascutney). Ever spent an actual winter there? How are you heating the shop?

    Second, how big is your basement? That would help.

    Third, are you sure you need a table saw? If you're cutting up sheet goods mostly, you might do well with an ezsmart or festool solution... and a nice bandsaw goes a long way...

    Thanks,

    Bill

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