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Thread: My first peice of old iron

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Warrensburg, Missouri right behind the University of Central Missouri.
    Posts
    17

    Smile My first peice of old iron

    Good day all.

    I just purchased a J-Line, Brodhead & Garrett table saw for $100. It came with the original fence, two miter gages, three cast iron extensions (2 with square corners and one with rounded). In really good condition except for chips, scratches and scuffs on the cabinet and it is missing the motor cover panel and one other access panel. It has a new looking 1-1/2 HP single phase motor.

    When I first saw it I figured it was old, but it work good and it was cheap. I wanted to get some information on the saw and found this forum. I spent yesterday and up till late last night reading through almost every thread and post in Old Iron and realized what I had. I am glad I found the forum.

    One problem though, I may have opened a can of worms, so let me explain.
    My father-in-law was an engineer at a specialty metals company with made parts for air craft and specialty applications. He worked on the design for the clips and braces used in the restoration of the Statue of Liberty. They had to be made from an alloy that would be able to connect copper to the cast iron and steel frame without promoting corrosion. As a hobby he had always gone to auctions and estate sales and purchases any thing he thought was a buy.

    Well why do I ramble on about this? He passed away several years ago so every summer I pack up my family and head to Indiana to my wife's Mom's house and spend about a month doing projects on there house. Well this summer I will attempt to take down the two story barn. The biggest challenge I thought would be moving out all the stuff in the barn I called "junk". You can barely open the front barn door and the only way to get in is climb over all the "junk".

    Well this is the point I was trying to get to before the story started. All that junk are the tools, farm implements, chains, anvils, equipment and just about many pieces of equipment. I know there are both bench and pedestal grinders, a couple laiths, a combination table saw/jointer/disksander, radial arm saws, drill presses, a large band saw and some other machinery which use I do not know. And I have never been more than half way to the back of the barn.

    Well after reading the forum I am afraid of all I may find. I may try to adopt a bunch of it and let it follow me home or put in storage. Before the forum I though I would just be able to call the scrap you and they would cart it away and me mother-in-law might get a few $ from it. And I know I will definitely be bringing my camera.

    Well I would like to say that all your posts may have saved a lot of old iron from the scrap yard, but it may cost me a lot of work and money in the long run.

    Well thank you and thanks a lot!!!! http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...ilies/rofl.gif


    Andy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    4,268
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Gingo View Post
    ......All that junk are the tools, ......... I know there are both bench and pedestal grinders, a couple laiths, a combination table saw/jointer/disksander, radial arm saws, drill presses, a large band saw and some other machinery which use I do not know. And I have never been more than half way to the back of the barn.
    Good gosh man! You may have a treasure store there and then again you may have junk too. But one mans trash is another treasure.

    If you read the old posts you saw some of my junk to treasures I have restored. Fact is there is a market for quality old machines. Most don't bring a lot more than scrap prices if they have to be restored, but there are few that will. Do ask before you do anything. I have contacts that might be interested in something. You never know!
    Last edited by Jeff Horton; 04-17-2008 at 02:52 AM.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Warrensburg, Missouri right behind the University of Central Missouri.
    Posts
    17
    Jeff
    Actually many of your posts is what changed my thinking about what is junk and what has value. Anyone with the money can go out and buy a bright and shiny new piece of equipment, but restoring and using a vintage piece of equipment would give a sense of satisfaction with each use. Just like with gardening, I may spend more in time and money than the vegetables would cost. By growing them I know the quality and enjoy sharing them with other.

    Andy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,487
    Glad you found us! congrats on the table saw and please do post pics of the "junk"!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,014
    Sounds like a buried treasure waiting to be uncovered. The tablesaw/jointer/sander is quite possibly an old Yates American like the one I left behind in New Mexico when I moved to California.
    My granddad used it to build cabinets for a cabin over 50 years ago, and it's still running strong for the friend who is "storing" it for me in NM. (He's used it in his one-man cabinet shop for nearly 17 years now.)
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
    Your story sounds similar to mine. Before my Grandfather died he gave me this 1909 Canedy Otto Post Drill Press. I looked at that and thought "now I will never use that," but where I grow up, if a person gives you things, you don't pick and chose what you take. You take it all, say thanks and then cull things later.

    Well I tossed that old drill press out in the weeds, but after my Grandfather died I felt kind of guilty and pulled the thing from the woods and restored it. It wasthen that I was hit with the old tool bug.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

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