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Thread: Reverting Back To Gravel?

  1. #1

    Reverting Back To Gravel?

    I don't live on a gravel road, but one drive down my road will make you wonder if going back to gravel would be better. I just learned that my town will NOT be paving any roads this year. Five years ago they paid the "outrageous price" of 22 dollars a ton. Today hot top is getting 400 dollars a ton.

    To be honest with you, I don't see many paving jobs in the near future,and with concrete costs almost as high as hot top, I wonder if some of these secondary roads like mine will revert back to gravel?

    My Grandfather, a 40 year Town Road Commissioner claims that once a person has a paved road, they will never allow it to revert back to gravel. Too many issues with washouts, dust and other gravel road issues. I would like to say that nessesity is the mother of invention, but I am not sure what would replace hot top. I am not sure we need anything, gravel works.

    So what do you think, will more and more secondary roads revert back to gravel with the high cost of hot top?

    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
    Posts
    5,533
    around here, the secondary and tertiary roads which are paved, get 'Oiled' every so often, which involves a coat of tar with fresh pea gravel dumped on it while still hot. Signs for a few weeks warning of fresh oil, and lots of loose stone kicking up until it gets fully embedded.
    -Ned

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    810
    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    around here, the secondary and tertiary roads which are paved, get 'Oiled' every so often, which involves a coat of tar with fresh pea gravel dumped on it while still hot. Signs for a few weeks warning of fresh oil, and lots of loose stone kicking up until it gets fully embedded.
    Yup !!! Most of the secondary roads where I lived in Northern Ontario were "tar and gravel" and I think that it makes one of the best road surfaces you can get. It's a bit noisier than rolled asphalt, but if the gravel roadbed underneath it is properly prepared it lasts just as long and gives better traction in winter (IMNSHO !!)

    cheers eh?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central (upstate) NY
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    Maybe you can use Ned's Prius to fill in a hole once he gets his new "office".

    I heard about the plight of Maine's roads on NPR awhile back. I hope you haven't broken a vehicle on your roads yet.

    Good luck out there!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    470
    Around here they call it "tar and chip." But same thing.

    We live on a gravel road. I'd rather have a really bad paved road than gravel. For 4 days this winter the bus wouldn't even come down our road. Pavement might get really bad, but it still does a better job keeping itself on top of the muck than gravel. Then there's regular mud--we can shovel it out of our garage by spring, and the dust when its dry. They put choloride down which helps, but not completely and it doesn't last forever.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Springfield OH
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    806
    Quote Originally Posted by John Bartley View Post
    , but if the gravel roadbed underneath it is properly prepared it lasts just as long and gives better traction in winter (IMNSHO !!)

    cheers eh?
    Theres the problem with most roads, proper preparation.
    If you don't fix the base nothing will stay on top of it, not Blacktop, not concrete, not gravel.

    The road in front of my place is a perfect example. They paved it 3 years ago and its coming apart down on the flat all ready. Why? because the water can't get away in a couple spots.

    You get what you pay for and as long as you go for the cheapest price your always going to sacrifice quality.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Kosmowski View Post
    Maybe you can use Ned's Prius to fill in a hole once he gets his new "office".

    I heard about the plight of Maine's roads on NPR awhile back. I hope you haven't broken a vehicle on your roads yet.

    Good luck out there!
    I'm certain that Costar will repurpose my car to another researcher
    -Ned

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Kosmowski View Post
    Maybe you can use Ned's Prius to fill in a hole once he gets his new "office".

    I heard about the plight of Maine's roads on NPR awhile back. I hope you haven't broken a vehicle on your roads yet.

    Good luck out there!
    They are pretty bad, but then again considering the freeze-thaw cycle they are subjected too, it only makes sense that they would be in bad shape. It was funny because the other day I was looking at Thorndike,Maine online and a blog of some woman came up. In it she wrote "we arrived in Thorndike after driving on the most pot-holed roads I ever traveled". Yep, no question,she was in Thorndike.

    I tried to remedy the problem one time, but that did not workout so good. I had a big pot hole near my house so I decided to fill it. Since I did not have cold-patch, I used concrete. That worked good until the road heaved differently then the concrete patch job. The snowplow came down over the hill, hit it and shot him right sideways in the road. He was not happy. Now I fill them with gravel.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  9. #9
    Roads are interesting in that the University of Maine recently did a study and test of wooden bridges. There are so many new epoxies and engineered beams out there that they concluded wooden bridges could hold up traffic, and last a very long time. Myself I would like to see more of these projects. Maybe not some huge wooden suspension bridge across the Penobscot River, but on some of these smaller roads I could see wooden bridges as being viable?
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Ogden, Utah
    Posts
    348
    Around here most repair work on city, county, and state roads now requires the use of RAP (recycled asphalt product) in varying proportions. They just rotomill the old surface, haul it back to the hot plant, run it through with the addition of a little extra oil, and lay it back on the road. It solves the problem of filling landfills with old asphalt and greatly reduces the need for liquid asphalt. Asphalt (or hot top or whatever the local term for it is where you live) is a product that can be recycled indefinitely and should be. Another thing around here that's changing fast is the cost of dumping things like concrete. It costs as much now to get rid of torn out concrete as it does to buy ready mix. But most concrete and gravel suppliers are now taking back torn out concrete, crushing it, recycling any rebar that's in it, and selling the crushed concrete as road base.

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