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Thread: Another faceplate question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    North Carolina Foothills
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    Another faceplate question

    What length of screw should you fasten wood to faceplate with? I have a jet mini lathe.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    I try to have about an inch of screw threads in the wood, You could perhaps go a little shallower, but I haven't wanted to push my luck and see how short was too short.

    You may already know this, but a lot of folks recommend that you don't use wood screws, but use sheet metal screws instead. My preference is to use 1 1/2" long hex head screws...mini lag bolts. I think I use #8 size screws (if memory serves me).
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Remlik, Virginia
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    It depends upon how thick the piece of wood is and how much waste you plan on being able to turn off. For small things I don't even used a faceplate anymore. I put the piece between the chuck and the tailstock; there is enough friction to hold most small things.

    When I use a faceplate with a big bowl blank, I attach it to where the wood will be removed when doing the inside of the bowl. After I turn the tenon and the outside of the bowl I don't need the faceplate any longer.
    Barbara

  4. #4
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    I agree with Vaughn and Barbara. I make sure I have a minimum of 3/4" of screw in the wood and the tailstock in place. How much screw threads I have in the wood depends on the size of the piece. I use stainless steel bolts with a square drive. If I use a faceplate on a bowl I do like Barbara does. I form the outside and the tenon, then chuck it up.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Weishapl View Post
    ...If I use a faceplate on a bowl I do like Barbara does. I form the outside and the tenon, then chuck it up.
    That makes three of us. By doing it that way, you usually don't have to worry about the screws being too long (unless it's a real shallow bowl).
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Tellico Plains, Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Weishapl View Post
    I agree with Vaughn and Barbara. I make sure I have a minimum of 3/4" of screw in the wood and the tailstock in place. How much screw threads I have in the wood depends on the size of the piece. I use stainless steel bolts with a square drive. If I use a faceplate on a bowl I do like Barbara does. I form the outside and the tenon, then chuck it up.
    Same here.. but I use the hex head sheet metal screws.. I'll start a bowl on a face plate, but most of the my other turnings which are mostly peppermills, I round between centers, then chuck up for drilling... then use jam chucks after the drilling to turn to shape.
    Chuck
    Tellico Plains, TN
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/TellicoTurnings
    My parents taught me to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder to find any.
    If you go looking for trouble, it will usually find you.

  7. #7
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    Unless it is a really large chuck of wood, I use my worm screw in my chuck, with the tailstock up tight, turn a tenon, then chuck it up. I seldom use faceplates any more.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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