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Thread: Quarter Sawn White Oak Legs - All 4 sides

  1. #1
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    Quarter Sawn White Oak Legs - All 4 sides

    Say, I seem to remember a technique for making table/chair legs with QSWO grain on all four sides. It seemed to have used either 4 triangular shaped pieces of wood, or a lock miter to put it together.

    Does this sound familiar? Can anyone point me to a magazine or online article that might describe the technique?

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    Say, I seem to remember a technique for making table/chair legs with QSWO grain on all four sides. It seemed to have used either 4 triangular shaped pieces of wood, or a lock miter to put it together.

    Does this sound familiar? Can anyone point me to a magazine or online article that might describe the technique?

    Thanks!
    Right on both counts - and I believe it was Fine Woodworking about 2 or 3 years ago.
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  3. #3
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    Another method is to take some stock, and laminate it. This gives you 2 good edges to your leg, and two edges with laminations showing. Then rip two thin pieces of veneer - like 1/8" thick - and glue it over the edges with the laminations. You then chamfer the edges, and the glue line virtually disappears, and you now have four good faces showing.

    Like this: Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #4
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    I use Art's method and here's the FWW article on the mitered method: http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworki...F.aspx?id=2435
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 04-22-2008 at 04:56 PM.
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  5. #5
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    Mark Singer had a little different method and did a Tutorial on making legs with 4 good sides, but I think it was on SMC before FWW got started.

  6. #6
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    Thanks!

    I sort of like the lamination method. Looks pretty easy...
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  7. #7
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    I've done the mitered technique on a tables. I don't have any pics of the leg ends but I 45'd the sides of each board and used #0 biscuits to line them up and added lots of clamps. They look good, but I also didn't use QS oak. I tried to at least match the grain patterns so they looked like solid stock. Below is the table.


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  8. #8
    Hello. There is a good example of this technique here:

    http://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/v...ic.php?t=23301

  9. #9
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    Rift sawing your lumber will give you the same look on all four faces without going thru all that trouble. And it is very stable, as well. Just need to start out with thick enough planks. I use a homemade window to orient the end grain just right (grain running on the diagonal from one corner to the opposite corner) then turn on the bandsaw.
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  10. #10
    I have used the method Art describes several times and am convinced its the way to go. This picture shows it a little bit (QS ash). Very easy to do with great results. Cutting the legs on the rift is great but you would have to start with mighty big stock to end up with, say, 3x3 legs. Barry
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Coffee Table detail.jpg  

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