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Thread: Finish for QSWO End Table

  1. #1
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    Finish for QSWO End Table

    Well, I've got the wood, and I'm laying out the cut lines.

    Just thinking I should start to consider finishing options.

    It's a fairly standard craftsman style end table (From Woodsmith Vol. 22 / No 127).

    The article does a good job on the construction techniques, but doesn't really mention what sort of finish to apply. I like the warm, light sort of tone they have in the article, and was just wondering if anybody wanted to share their favorite finishes for Quarter Sawn White Oak?

    Thanks!

    Brent
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
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  2. #2
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    For finish on a QSO I can only recommend what I use, which is the Sam Maloof style of finish. I use this for all my pieces because it goes on easily and in my dusty confines buffs out nicely. I used it on a piece I did in QSO a while back and it turned out nicely also; nice tone and contrast.

    For oak however fuming with ammonia is a popular method. The ammonia gas reacts with the tannic acid in the wood to darken it naturally. I have read though that the overall affect of fuming is quite consistent in tone. And this might not be desirous when using QSO as you want highlight the contrast between the ray fleck standard grain pattern. If you use the fuming wear gloves and mask for sure.

  3. #3
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    Is this the formula you are talking about?


    http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...7&postcount=12

    <Copied from Drew Watsons post referenced above>

    This is the recipe that I was given but I was wondering what the diferences is between using the urethane and polyurethane in the mix. I have been told that using a more pure form gets better results. Been itching to try it out but can't seem to find anything besides the polyurethane in the local stores. Can anyone give me some direction in this matter?

    Thanks

    The Sam Maloof Finish Recipe

    The Sam Maloof finish consists of two finishes: A varnish/oil mixure followed by an oil/varnish/beeswax mixture. The first mixture is applied until you are satisfied with the build-up. Then you apply the second finish, which does require some elbow grease! You can purchase the finish pre-mixed from Rockler, or you can mix your own. I provide two Mixture 1 recipes. Mixture 1 Version 1 is the traditional Sam Maloof finish. It takes a while to dry--leave at least 24 hours between coats. Mixture 1 Version 2 is an oft-used finish that provides a little better penetration, is easier to apply, and dries faster.

    Mixture 1 Recipe (Version 1)
    Mix equal parts of the following:
    - Boiled Linseed Oil
    - Raw Tung oil (not Waterlox, Dalys, or other tung oils containing resin additives)
    - Semi-Gloss urethene varnish

    Mixture 1 Recipe (Version 2)
    Mix equal parts of the following:
    - Thinner. Use paint thinner, mineral spirits, or naptha. Feel free to use a bit less thinner and more varnish or oil. The thinner is present to help the finish penetrate the pores of the wood, rather than lay on the surface.
    - Varnish. Virtually any quality varnish will do. I prefer a standard oil varnish rather than a fast drying varnish.
    - Oil. Use either boiled linseed oil or raw tung oil. Again, do not use Waterlox, Daly's, or other tung oils that have added resins.

    Mixture 2 Recipe
    Mix 2 handfuls of shredded beeswax to equal parts of boiled linseed oil and raw tung oil. Heat the mixture in a double-boiler on an electric hotplate just until the wax melts. Due to the volatile nature of the ingredients, brew your mixture outdoors. When cooled, the mixture should have the consistency of heavy cream.

    General Application
    Apply three to four coats of Mixture 1. Let oil sit on surface for 5-10 minutes. Optionally, sand mixture into wood using 400-600 grit wet and dry sandpaper. Remove excess oil with a clean cloth/paper towel. Allow at least 24 hours drying time between each coat. Apply two to three coats of Mixture 2. Rub Mixture 2 into the surface vigourously.
    Reply With Quote
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    Is this the formula you are talking about?


    http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...7&postcount=12

    <Copied from Drew Watsons post referenced above>

    This is the recipe that I was given but I was wondering what the diferences is between using the urethane and polyurethane in the mix. I have been told that using a more pure form gets better results. Been itching to try it out but can't seem to find anything besides the polyurethane in the local stores. Can anyone give me some direction in this matter?

    Thanks

    The Sam Maloof Finish Recipe

    The Sam Maloof finish consists of two finishes: A varnish/oil mixure followed by an oil/varnish/beeswax mixture. The first mixture is applied until you are satisfied with the build-up. Then you apply the second finish, which does require some elbow grease! You can purchase the finish pre-mixed from Rockler, or you can mix your own. I provide two Mixture 1 recipes. Mixture 1 Version 1 is the traditional Sam Maloof finish. It takes a while to dry--leave at least 24 hours between coats. Mixture 1 Version 2 is an oft-used finish that provides a little better penetration, is easier to apply, and dries faster.

    Mixture 1 Recipe (Version 1)
    Mix equal parts of the following:
    - Boiled Linseed Oil
    - Raw Tung oil (not Waterlox, Dalys, or other tung oils containing resin additives)
    - Semi-Gloss urethene varnish

    Mixture 1 Recipe (Version 2)
    Mix equal parts of the following:
    - Thinner. Use paint thinner, mineral spirits, or naptha. Feel free to use a bit less thinner and more varnish or oil. The thinner is present to help the finish penetrate the pores of the wood, rather than lay on the surface.
    - Varnish. Virtually any quality varnish will do. I prefer a standard oil varnish rather than a fast drying varnish.
    - Oil. Use either boiled linseed oil or raw tung oil. Again, do not use Waterlox, Daly's, or other tung oils that have added resins.

    Mixture 2 Recipe
    Mix 2 handfuls of shredded beeswax to equal parts of boiled linseed oil and raw tung oil. Heat the mixture in a double-boiler on an electric hotplate just until the wax melts. Due to the volatile nature of the ingredients, brew your mixture outdoors. When cooled, the mixture should have the consistency of heavy cream.

    General Application
    Apply three to four coats of Mixture 1. Let oil sit on surface for 5-10 minutes. Optionally, sand mixture into wood using 400-600 grit wet and dry sandpaper. Remove excess oil with a clean cloth/paper towel. Allow at least 24 hours drying time between each coat. Apply two to three coats of Mixture 2. Rub Mixture 2 into the surface vigourously.
    Reply With Quote

    Brent,

    I would just give it a try with what is available in your local harware store. To be cautious you can try some on a test piece of wood. I don't think it will make any difference if you use polyurethane or urethane.

  5. #5
    Brent,

    Here's the schedule I used on this table:

    1. Sand to 150 grit and wipe the wood with distilled water to raise the grain. Sand with 180 grit when dry and remove all the dust from the pores.

    2. Stain with Transtint Dark Vintage Maple diluted at 1oz dye to 2qt water.

    3. Apply one coat Waterlox Original Sealer and Finish. Let dry one day and scuff sand with 320 grit.

    4. Apply Bartley Walnut Gel Stain. Wipe clean and let dry overnight.

    5. Apply 2 coats Waterlox Original Satin Finish.



    I'm pretty happy with how the color came out.

    Keith

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Kieth, that turned out awesome looking!

    Thanks for the tip. I hope I can make mine look 1/2 as good.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  7. #7
    Brent,

    Overall I'm pretty happy with it, but if I had to do it all over again, I would have ensured that the legs had QS grain on all faces. The plain sawn grain bothers me every time I look at it.

    Keith

  8. #8
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    Aug 2007
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    After thinking it all through, and going through my stack of wood, I think I will miter and glue up my legs so that I get the QS grain on all four sides.

    The only reason I'm going to do it that way though, is that all of the lumber I have is 4/4 S2S already, so I don't really have anything thick enough for the legs. I'd have to do a glue up no matter what.

    Might pop over to a local wood working store and see what they have in the way of lock miter bits to use for that...

    If I were you, I wouldn't worry about the flatsawn sides one bit. I think it looks great with the through tenons and the pegs...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


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