Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Optimum Blade Type For Milling Cove Molding On A TS

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    161

    Optimum Blade Type For Milling Cove Molding On A TS

    I was hoping to get some information about what would be the best blade to use when milling out wide (4+ inches) cove molding on the table saw? I currently have a Forrest WWII and the Freud LM72R Heavy Duty Rip blade. For this operation, would it be best to use a blade dedicated to ripping, or crosscutting, or is a combination blade (like the WWII) OK, as well?

    Thanks very much for any help!!

    - Keith
    "Listen, here's the thing. If you can't spot the sucker in the first half hour at the table, then you ARE the sucker. "

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ozarks
    Posts
    4,993
    keith, i`d use whichever one has the heaviest plate. thin kerfs don`t do well with side loads. if both are heavy then less teeth is easier on the saw.
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central (upstate) NY
    Posts
    1,457
    If the smaller blade size would still give acceptable results I would put on the two outer blades of the stacked dado set just for extra rigidity.

    Does anyone else know if a TCG or ATB tooth type would give a difference in the quality of the cove surface?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    smithville,tx.
    Posts
    141
    cmt-makes a 7"-diameter with six cutters -it' at least a 1/2"thick plate-woodcraft sells the set with six router bits for around $400.00-just the table saw cutter is around $200.00,they work better than using a saw blade.



    rounding off the sharp corners
    alex

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southern Louisiana
    Posts
    947
    i would go with thicker plate also. i'd also use the one with less teeth to do most of the work, then maybe try to get a cleaner cut on the last pass with a blade that has more teeth. sanding those saw marks out was a bugger when i made mine. used some 60 grit on my ROS to get the marks off then used a lighter grit to finish it.

    if you got 200 bucks the piece by cmt would be nice. i think you can read about it on woodshopdemos.com

    good luck

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    smithville,tx.
    Posts
    141
    a goose-neck scraper sharpened right works well to get the saw marks out-also when you get to the last few cuts -take six passes instead of three.


    rounding off the sharps corners
    alex

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    1,448
    The scoring marks of an ATB blade like the WW II leave a lot of scratches. A rip blade with raker teeth does a smoother job.

    On the other hand, since I went to my current big saw, I no longer have a rip blade, and the WW II works fine - just some extra sanding or scraping.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

Similar Threads

  1. Milling an Oak
    By Charles Hans in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-18-2014, 02:08 AM
  2. Slide top cove boxes
    By michael stafford in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-14-2014, 10:12 PM
  3. Method or tooling to do a cove cut on the inside of a desk leg.
    By Jim O'Dell in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-23-2011, 05:13 PM
  4. Which blade material type?
    By Steve Southwood in forum Neander Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-04-2011, 01:49 AM
  5. Milling Around
    By Don Orr in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-05-2010, 05:08 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •