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Thread: Please help me identify and kill this plant

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
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    470

    Please help me identify and kill this plant

    This is some kind of bushy plant that seems pretty common around here. The grow fast--this one is maybe a year old and is about 3-4' high. Left alone they'll grow 10'+ high in a few years. First, I'd like to identify what they are. Second, I want to try to find a way to control them.

    Brush hogging them doesn't seem to kill them--maybe even makes the spread. Plus brush hogging knocks down the grasses and and trees I want to encourage. So I'd like to find something I can spot spray to try to kill them (knowing that the overspray is going to do some damage, but I can live with that.) Preferably something that's not too expensive since I have about 7 acres to spot spray.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCF2454.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    Looks like persimmon, the bane of pastures. Critters spread the seeds which germinate like crazy. You will never stop it. But the plants you have now can be killed easily with Roundup.

  3. #3
    In order to do battle with anything you are far better off to know your adversary and then take counter-measures. In this case, I would find out what the plant is, and then find out what it thrives in. Weeds are natures way of letting you know a nutrient imbalance is taking place. Once you know what your soil is lacking, or what you have an abundance of, you can figure out a way to change it.

    For instance here we have lots of problems with golden rod taking over pastures or hay fields.The best way to deal with it is to actually spread urea on the pasture. This ups the nitrogen and makes the grass compete with the golden rod...so much that in a years time the golden rod is on the retreat. In the meantime we get better grass that keeps the milk production up.

    Lime also may help depending on the weed in question is nitrogen loving or alkali loving. Lime and Urea are both easy broadcast spread over a pasture so its a no invasive way of dealing with the problem (no tilling or spraying herbicide).
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    kennewick wa
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    31
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Meiser View Post
    This is some kind of bushy plant that seems pretty common around here. The grow fast--this one is maybe a year old and is about 3-4' high. Left alone they'll grow 10'+ high in a few years. First, I'd like to identify what they are. Second, I want to try to find a way to control them.

    Brush hogging them doesn't seem to kill them--maybe even makes the spread. Plus brush hogging knocks down the grasses and and trees I want to encourage. So I'd like to find something I can spot spray to try to kill them (knowing that the overspray is going to do some damage, but I can live with that.) Preferably something that's not too expensive since I have about 7 acres to spot spray.
    you may want to try your county extension office for some help
    Stacey

  5. #5
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    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Springfield OH
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    806
    Good grief Travis, you sound almost like an organic farmer

    Matt, Travis is right weeds do thrive on unbalanced soils,
    Soil samples sent to a soil lab will tell you exactly what your missing

    Of course Roundup will kill it, along with everything else it gets on. If you don't want that poison around try
    4 cups white vinegar
    1/4 cup salt
    2 teaspoons dish detergent

    you may have to spray a couple times but it does work

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Mickley View Post
    Good grief Travis, you sound almost like an organic farmer

    Matt, Travis is right weeds do thrive on unbalanced soils,
    Soil samples sent to a soil lab will tell you exactly what your missing

    Of course Roundup will kill it, along with everything else it gets on. If you don't want that poison around try
    4 cups white vinegar
    1/4 cup salt
    2 teaspoons dish detergent

    you may have to spray a couple times but it does work


    Of course, that is correct. However, Roundup does not have any residual effect and the grasses will grow back quickly.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Suburban DC (formerly western PA)
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    176
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Mickley View Post
    Good grief Travis, you sound almost like an organic farmer

    Matt, Travis is right weeds do thrive on unbalanced soils,
    Soil samples sent to a soil lab will tell you exactly what your missing

    Of course Roundup will kill it, along with everything else it gets on. If you don't want that poison around try
    4 cups white vinegar
    1/4 cup salt
    2 teaspoons dish detergent

    you may have to spray a couple times but it does work
    Will this mixture kill poison ivy too?
    "We didn't lose the game; we just ran out of time."--Vince Lombardi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Carlyle IL
    Posts
    350
    Try using Brush Buster, Pramitol, or BrushMaster.

    BrushMaster's label reads as follows Weeds Controlled, 45+ multiflora roses, brammbles, cedar, honeysuckle, poison ivy, kudzu, trees, vines, etc.

    BrushBuster's label is similar, it reads some of the above plus sumac.

    Pramitol is also good.

    joe

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,442
    I'd agree with Travis on knowing what your dealing with and also call the county extension to see what their advice is. If you can control the current year's plants from going to seed then you can eliminate it by keeping it from procreating anymore. Much like my wife did to me.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    470
    It will probably be a constant battle as this is prolific around the area. We have an easement at the back of our property for some power lines (almost 1/4 mile from the house) and the company that owns them is coming through this year to clear under them. The neighbors on either side of me have ones large enough that they are coming in with chainsaws, then some machine that will grind up all the smaller stuff, and finally they are going to spot spray. So that might help, but there will still be plenty on other parts of both neighbors' properties.

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