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Thread: Cumaro decking-is it usable for outdoor furniture?

  1. #1
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    Cumaro decking-is it usable for outdoor furniture?

    Im looking for a suitable hard wood thats both strong and resistant to rot.
    I found Cumaru decking, 3/4"x5.5" that would be close enough in size (limited wasted for the price)and Im guessing its smooth enough on 3 surfaces so it would make it easy enough for me to work with.
    Is there any reason anyone knows of that would make this type decking unsuitable to make outdoor furniture with?
    Im totally unfamiliar with this wood, other than what I read.
    Redwood decking, PT decking, presents no problems, as Ive used them both to build furniture with.
    This would be a huge savings for me moneywise, and actually allow me to build with quality hardwood(?) at a low enough price.
    Any help or answers would be appreciated.
    Last edited by allen levine; 05-20-2008 at 03:48 PM.

  2. #2
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    Allen,

    Looks like it's endangered: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umburana_Do_Cheiro

    But people are using it for flooring:

    http://www.brazilianhardwood.com/pro...brazilianteak/

    My guess is it would be fairly longlasting outside, with proper finishing. Interesting factoid: "It is one of the densest woods available at 280% as hard as domestic red oak."

    try this link: http://www.mercomarine.com/Boat%20Do...20decking.html

    of perhaps more interest: http://www.sanantoniowholesalelumber.com/cumaru.htm



    Thanks,

    Bill
    Last edited by Bill Lantry; 05-20-2008 at 04:24 PM.

  3. #3
    I have not used this timber but have used Tatajuba which is similarly dense. Absolutely horribly soul destroying to work with. Tragic on tooling, way too heavy for comfort and a real pain to use screws in. If you don't drill oversized pilots you will break lots of screws. I used to use 3 drill bits to finish a chair because unless your bit is really sharp you will burn or waste a lot of time drilling. Dense is an advantage right up until the moment when too dense takes over. If you can get it cheap by all means try it but I will be surprised if you enjoy the experience

  4. #4
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    I was going to be in buffalo, and found a dealer, Advantage,(was ready to give them a buzz) figured Id buy 400, maybe 500 feet I could take home.
    But if its that tough when it comes to drilling and handling, Im going to have to skip it.
    Im no sissy, but Im also looking to enjoy the work I do.
    White oak is tough enough for me, so if this is so dense and heavy, I dont think I can deal with it.

    Thankyou for all the quick responses.

    Im just searching for an alternative hardwood, besides white oak, of beauty, strength, and something along exotic.(and price, price being the major issue, as long as I can handle the wood)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Barley View Post
    Absolutely horribly soul destroying to work with. Tragic on tooling, way too heavy for comfort and a real pain to use screws in. If you don't drill oversized pilots you will break lots of screws. I used to use 3 drill bits to finish a chair because unless your bit is really sharp you will burn or waste a lot of time drilling. Dense is an advantage right up until the moment when too dense takes over.

    Ian, I almost laughed at your post. It seems youve had your share of bad experiences with this sort of hardwood.
    Your post alone scared me away from any thoughts of purchasing it.Im not the type that would enjoy fighting with drillbits and screws.
    Have you worked with any other exotic hardwoods rot resistant that you would recommend I give a shot?(if its too pricey, I wouldnt consider it)

  6. #6
    Allen - bear in mind that my experience is with a different species albeit very similar sounding from the descriptions I have found. I use Cedar, European Oak and Iroko. My oak is similar to work to Amercian White although a bit more grainy generally. I don't know if you get Iroko - West African timber - works a bit like Teak and used to be sold over here as West african Teak. Pretty tough on blades and can be "dimensionally unstable" unless you choose the right grain. Dust is horrid - sticky smelly and very fine. If I was you I would stick with the Oak.

  7. #7
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    How come Steve Ash hasen't chimed in on this thread? He's the Chevy expert.




    Sorry. Couldn't resist.
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  8. #8
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    thats cumaru to you.

  9. #9
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    against all better judgement, I went ahead and ordered some cumaru wood.
    I went looking for teak, and its out of the question.
    I got me some african mahogany also, pinkish in color,(I guess Ill stain it dark mahogany) so Im going to try a few chairs in all types of wood.
    I will eventually build an entire outdoor set for myself out of the wood I find the most beautiful, hard, but manageable to work with
    Ill put up some pics of the raw woods when I get it this week.(I received the mahogany already)
    Last edited by allen levine; 06-03-2008 at 04:31 PM.

  10. #10
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    Allen,
    DOllar short and a day late on this, but how about looking at Lyptus for the outdoor furniture if that c-stuff turns out to be less than pleasant? also,
    if you're willing to go to buffalo to buy wood, how about another dealer closer to home, (only a little),Check out Lakeshorehardwoods.com Brian is the proprietor and he's really knowledgable and nice to deal with. Plus he ships nationwide.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rennie Heuer View Post
    How come Steve Ash hasen't chimed in on this thread? He's the Chevy expert.

    Sorry. Couldn't resist.
    Hey, Steve does fine work, but I'm pretty certain he likes Chevelles, not camaros. Wish I still had my 69 to play with.
    Last edited by Ned Bulken; 06-03-2008 at 06:02 PM.
    -Ned

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