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Thread: wood rack angle

  1. #1
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    wood rack angle

    OK gang,
    I'm planningto do some actual woodworking this coming weekend, in addition to other things (don't go there Mark, Rennie, Chuck, et al...). And one of the projects I'm planning on knocking out is making a wood rack for my shop. The last rack I had the pleasure to use was built by some friends during a BBQ, and I wasn't involved in the critical design phase, just the screwing it to the wall phase.

    SO...

    I'm planning on the basic 2x4 with gussets out from the studs rack. And IIRC the usual practice is to cut the arms so that they are at a slight upward angle to help battle deflection under load. And again IIRC it should be something like 5 degrees. SOund about right to y'all?
    -Ned

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bulken View Post
    ...I'm planning on the basic 2x4 with gussets out from the studs rack. And IIRC the usual practice is to cut the arms so that they are at a slight upward angle to help battle deflection under load. And again IIRC it should be something like 5 degrees. SOund about right to y'all?
    5° should be just fine.

    How much weight do you anticipate having on the rack/shelves?

    For loads up to around 50~60 pounds per 12" wide shelf, I've used ¾" EMT (electrical conduit) as shelf supports, and just drill the proper sized holes into the edge of the studs. Drilling about 2½" deep, at a 5° angle, worked out very well. I just inserted a length of conduit in every other, or every third, stud and laid my lunber across them. I used this method in two different sheds at my California homes, and it worked quite well, with no perceptable deflection over ten years. that I lived in those houses.

    Are you going to leave your lumber out in the rain, what with no roof on the shop?
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    5° should be just fine. I've used ¾" EMT (electrical conduit) as shelf supports, and just drill the proper sized holes into the edge of the studs. Drilling about 2½" deep, at a 5° angle, worked out very well. I just inserted a length of conduit in every other, or every third, stud and laid my lumber across them. I used this method in two different sheds at my California homes, and it worked quite well, with no perceptible deflection over ten years. that I lived in those houses.

    Are you going to leave your lumber out in the rain, what with no roof on the shop?
    Sorry Ned, but my first reaction was to reply...
    4:12
    As Jim notes, 5 degrees should be fine. I'm assuming the 2x's are dedicated to the wood rack only and do not support anything else. Were you to use this on an existing wall (don't laugh, it's been done) use caution - a 3/4" hole in the edge of a stud does not leave much wood to support whatever load is on the wall. I MIGHT use this method on a partition wall, but would not use it on a bearing wall.
    Last edited by Rennie Heuer; 05-21-2008 at 01:54 PM.
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  4. #4
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    I just built one about 3 months ago - i used some 4x4's i had and some 3/4" galvanized electrical conduit (like Jim mentioned). I attached the uprights to the ceiling joists at 32" on center (every other joist) and anchored them to the floor for a 10' run. I drilled the holes about 2-1/2" deep every 14" at about a 5% angle. I loaded it up right away and have been very happy with it since. You might expect the conduit to bend noticeably under the load, but it does just fine.
    If i were building it again and buying all the material new, i think i'd double up 2x4's (or even just 2x3's) instead of using 4x4's - same performance for less money.
    Paul Hubbman

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    Are you going to leave your lumber out in the rain, what with no roof on the shop?
    He needs somewhere to store the materials for the roof! They are taking up too much floor space on the floor!
    Ken
    ------



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    5° should be just fine.

    How much weight do you anticipate having on the rack/shelves?

    For loads up to around 50~60 pounds per 12" wide shelf, I've used ¾" EMT (electrical conduit) as shelf supports, and just drill the proper sized holes into the edge of the studs. Drilling about 2½" deep, at a 5° angle, worked out very well. I just inserted a length of conduit in every other, or every third, stud and laid my lunber across them. I used this method in two different sheds at my California homes, and it worked quite well, with no perceptable deflection over ten years. that I lived in those houses.

    Are you going to leave your lumber out in the rain, what with no roof on the shop?
    Initially it is to get the lumber from out of the yard into the shop, I've got a few two by's just sitting on a pallet at the moment, and SWMBO would like them to leave so the yard can look better. and I hope to have a roof on by this weekend if all goes well.

    in the long run i'm planning on storing my cherry and maple on them, so figure 8 to 10' wide racks and 200-400bf of dried lumber at first, more to follow.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rennie Heuer View Post
    Sorry Ned, but my first reaction was to reply...
    4:12
    As Jim notes, 5 degrees should be fine. I'm assuming the 2x's are dedicated to the wood rack only and do not support anything else. Were you to use this on an existing wall (don't laugh, it's been done) use caution - a 3/4" hole in the edge of a stud does not leave much wood to support whatever load is on the wall. I MIGHT use this method on a partition wall, but would not use it on a bearing wall.
    The two by's will be sistered to the stud wall, but the rack will be holding the weight up, not the wall (other than keeping them vertical). I was going to gusset the rack to the studs with plywood gussets screwed into the studs. No major holes going into the studs at all.
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Hubbman View Post
    I just built one about 3 months ago - i used some 4x4's i had and some 3/4" galvanized electrical conduit (like Jim mentioned). I attached the uprights to the ceiling joists at 32" on center (every other joist) and anchored them to the floor for a 10' run. I drilled the holes about 2-1/2" deep every 14" at about a 5% angle. I loaded it up right away and have been very happy with it since. You might expect the conduit to bend noticeably under the load, but it does just fine.
    If i were building it again and buying all the material new, i think i'd double up 2x4's (or even just 2x3's) instead of using 4x4's - same performance for less money.
    Paul Hubbman
    That sounds doable. I'm going to be using up weathered two by's that won't be going into the remaining structure of the shop after spending the winter in the weather, but they'll work fine for rack duty.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Fitzgerald View Post
    He needs somewhere to store the materials for the roof! They are taking up too much floor space on the floor!
    Roofer's bringing the materials for the roof wise guy. so there
    -Ned

  7. #7
    Ned,

    I had the guy who built the shop shell put the roof on. Otherwise, I'd probably still be doing it. I've always been scared of heights even when I worked on oil rigs as a teenager and did have to go aloft and help the derrick hand on occasion. But since I broke my back, I'm real leery about taking another fall. The next time I could be a parapallegic. The thought scares me. When I got up on the roof to install the weatherhead for the electrical service in the shop, my toes were leaving toeprints into the shingles. I clean my gutters out from a ladder now.

    But Hey! You have 3 more years before you even come close to taking my record of 4 years of shop construction from me......
    Ken
    ------



  8. #8
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    Ken,
    I recall that you and I share that height concern, for much the same reason. In my case it was a car accident about 10 years ago, and while i 'merely' had two sets of ribs out of joint, it sure was a wake up call.

    Glad you're enjoying your shop finally, hope to be joining you in a couple of weeks.
    -Ned

  9. #9
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    well ned i had to bite:)

    as for the roofin materials bein deliverd this wknd you better build another shed for them as for the lumber storage goes do you really have enough room in the shop for 400 bf of lumber? not being mean here, but it takes some space and you still have to work in there too....sometime in the next 3 years that ken gave you to finish in... if you got access to a storage area be it a freinds or rent one or just outside under cover you would be better off... the rack can be made from ply wood and be self supporting look at what tod has...the boughten ones are built well and for the small amounts needed for a project to acculimate you would probally be better off to. buy some shefl supports from lee valley or such.. see that wasnt so bad was it? i held back from beun to hard on ya but after you beat kens record then i will go for the justo
    Last edited by larry merlau; 05-21-2008 at 09:59 PM. Reason: help out ned in the code
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  10. #10
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    Ned still needs a roofing crew???? gosh, I thought he had one all lined up a while ago.

    I could loan you mine Ned.....be quite a commute but they ain't afeared of heights.
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