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Thread: Chainsaw Ripping Question and some help please......

  1. #1
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    Chainsaw Ripping Question and some help please......

    OK, in >> this thread << you can see that I'm ripping logs into bowl blanks.

    The saw I'm using is an older electric beast of a saw, this thing weighs a ton, but it is quiet and boy does it cut!

    Thing is, when I'm ripping like this, the saw packs up with long strips of wood, in about 15 seconds


    This is it, packed up, fairly badly, not REALLY badly....

    I think the handle is not in the best spot, and I'm thinking of moving it further back, so the chips may fall easier.


    Here it is all cleaned out, I made up this little "hook tool" to help remove the chips, but it is still a pain. I'm not kidding when I say I cut for 20 seconds, stop, and clean it out

    I was wondering a few things, one, anyone else who rips wood like this, with a gas chainsaw, do you have a similar problem? I did not have a problem like this with the Tokyo Log Hog, slicing planks of wood....

    Also, how about some sort of a block that the chain would run through, to limit the amount of chips that wrap around the drive cog and stuff themselves up into this thing? I know that the block would eventually get eaten up, but I don't use this saw daily, so, maybe that is an idea?

    thought's...?

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    Stu, I'm not an expert, but at Bill Grumbine's Robust party he talked a little about the differences between ripping chains (I think he used a skip tooth ripping chain) and crosscutting chains. I think you might be ripping with a crosscut chain.

    Hopefully someone else will chime in on this matter.

    The other thing I remember is that ripping chains are often not sold through "consumer" outlets.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
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    Mark, I have a ripping skip tooth chain on my gas saw, and it works well, but it would just cut more, the problem is not the cutting this saw cut fine, and I need it to cut cross cut too, so a different chain would be a pain, the problem is the chips, the long stringy ones from ripping, are jamming up in the saw, the volume is just too much!

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
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    Stu,

    Is it like that on just this species of wood or more than one kind?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Reid View Post
    Stu,

    Is it like that on just this species of wood or more than one kind?
    Most anything, but only ripping, cross cutting it does just fine!

    I think part of the problem is the chain speed is not fast, so the long stringy chips can build up

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Same here

    Hi Stu,

    The same thing happens to me when ripping wood with a crosscut chain with both an electric and gas saws. I just stop, clean it out and keep going. A PITA for sure but I don't know of a cure for the stringy chips. My little McCulloch electric is much slower than a gas saw but it works OK. It doesn't get as jammed up as yours though. It actually drags the chips all the way around the drive gear and spits them out the front when the bottom gets clogged. Wish I could be more help.
    Don Orr

    Woodturners make the World go ROUND

  7. #7
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    Stu,

    The reason you're getting long shavings is because you're cutting "along" the grain. If you were cutting into an end grain (across the end grain), you'd get very small shavings. While a ripping chain does help, a cross cut chain will work just fine (as you already know) for doing small jobs like bowl blanks. Cross cutting is really "cross" in both dimensions whereas ripping is never across the diameter, but can be across the end. Ya...I know...clear as mud

    How to solve the clogging problem? Every saw is different, but opening the exhaust area behind the chain will certainly help I think.

    cheers eh?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Bartley View Post
    Stu,
    The reason you're getting long shavings is because you're cutting "along" the grain. If you were cutting into an end grain (across the end grain), you'd get very small shavings. While a ripping chain does help, a cross cut chain will work just fine (as you already know) for doing small jobs like bowl blanks. Cross cutting is really "cross" in both dimensions whereas ripping is never across the diameter, but can be across the end. Ya...I know...clear as mud
    This about sums it up... I mill a LOT of lumber, both with a csm (chain saw mill) and a Ripsaw handheld bandmill, and those "rooster tails" that clog your saw like that are just the nature of the beast when your cutting along the grain like that. All my saws do the same thing when I'm cutting in that orientation. I have a powerful enough chainsaw (Husky 395XP) that it can take quite a bite without wimping out, so I tend to go to fast, and those long stringy tails then clog in the sprocket area, so if I go slower, I can go longer before having to stop and clean them out. If I'm extra patient and careful sometimes it doesn't even clog to where I have to stop and clear it. In my case though, with that saw, I just have to reach down and pull the "wad" sticking out the bottom out of the way with my hand and doing that every 10-20 seconds clears it. Yes, my saw continues to run while I do this, but it's just idling, and I'm never actually putting my fingers up into the sprocket area where the chain is, as enough sticks out after it clogs that I can just pull the wad sticking out out of the way to clear it.

    Nature of the beast.
    Build it Break it Fix it ...repeat

  9. #9
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    Yer chain's too sharp. Bury it at full speed into the dirt a few times, and you won't have to worry about the clogging. Asphalt or concrete will work too, but you won't get the cool rooster tail of dust that dirt can provide.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  10. #10
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    Man, I know I can always count of you for such great advice Vaughn, thanks buddy!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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