Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Question about SuperNova2 chuck

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
    Posts
    1,407

    Question about SuperNova2 chuck

    A while back I purchased a SuperNova2 chuck and a fairly complete set of jaws. A problem I ran into is that the coverage of tenon sizes is not continuous (definition: tenon to me is the stub of wood that the chuck contracts onto to hold the piece).

    For example, if you make the tenon 4", the 100mm jaws are too small at max extension (max size about 3.89"), and the 130mm jaws will not contract down to 4" (min size is about 4.25"). The same thing seems to be true for a tenon of about 3".

    Now, I guess I could keep a table of the max and min sizes in the shop and only make tenons that are supported, but that seems like a very poor design of the chuck. I should be able to make a tenon of any size from the smallest supported by the smallest jaws, to the max size supported by the largest jaws - the support should be continuous across the jaws.

    I'm PO'ed enough that I'm going to sell the SuperNova2 but I don't want to buy another brand that has the same problem. Any recommendations?

    Or am I missing something?

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Stow, OH
    Posts
    151
    Mike,

    This is the min. and max range of all Nova jaws with different model of Nova chucks.
    http://www.teknatool.com/products/Ch...inch)Sep06.pdf
    Gordon

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    I've got a Supernova 2 and a G3 and I've seen the same "sizing gaps" you mentioned on both of them. So far, it really hasn't been a problem, since my tenon dimensions are pretty flexible. When I find I'm at the "in between" size, I just make the tenon a bit smaller until it fits the next size down.

    I'd say that for about 95% of what I've turned with a chuck, I've used either the 50mm standard jaws or the 45mm spigot jaws. I've got the 100mm jaws, but haven't really used them much. I tend to prefer smaller feet, so I usually start with a smallish tenon.

    (Let me know if you decide to sell the SN2. I might be interested.)
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
    Mike,

    I've have the SN2 and a pretty complete set of jaws too. I found the same problem. The only time I've run into a problem with the gaps is turning Ed Davdison's acrylic blanks. The diameter of the blanks is such, that I can't grasp one with any of the SN2 jaws to drill the b/s blanks on the lathe. When you drill them on the d/p, it's easy to get them ever so slightly off centered. Woodcraft now carries a set of rubber jaws that can be turned to grasp what ever size you need. I haven't tried them yet.

    If you put that SN2 up for sale, I might be interested also.
    Ken
    ------



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Villa Park, CA
    Posts
    1,407
    Thanks for the replies. Since I posted I've been doing some research on other chucks and it seems that all of them have similar gaps.

    A problem I encountered is that I'd turn a tenon on the lid of a box (for example), then part off the top to turn the inside of the top. But when I try to mount it in the chuck (which until then was being used to hold the blank) it doesn't fit. I'm then in a pickle since I can't turn the tenon down (since I parted the top off). Just extremely irritating and not something I expected anyone would design.

    If all the "name" chucks have the same problem, I'l have to live with it, but I certainly expected better. If I had many chucks, I could trial fit the chuck before I parted off the top but I only have one SN2.

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    191
    I have a set of plywood scraps with the min/max dimensions cut out so I can make sure the tenons are the correct size. Easy to create and solves the issues you have been experiencing.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Benson, Arizona
    Posts
    34
    Like Gari said; take some 1/4" plywood scraps could use 1/2" or 3/4" make a go no go board. IE; max and min. of each jaw size. I keep mine right next to the lathe to check my tenon size. I usually made mine a hair to large until I went with the plywood gauge.
    Always like learning something new!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Drums, PA
    Posts
    292
    Doesn't that stink! Drove me nuts when I first started.

    But to tell you the truth, I hardly notice it any more. I just got used to how big I need to make a tenon.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
    Posts
    4,834
    Mike I believe you will find that problem with most all chucks. I bought a Vicmarc VM100 and found the $99 Griz chuck is the same thing. So for $99 I bought 3 of them. I put the Cole jaws on one, the shark jaws on one, the 4" jaws on one and the regular jaws on the VM 100. Most times I use the shark jaws which go from 1 5/8" to 3 1/8" or the regular jaws which go from 1 1/4" to 2 3/4". Which ever chuck I have on I use a calipers set for like 2 3/4" for the shark jaws or 2" for the regular jaws. Just something you live with.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Yep, that sucks, the only way around it I've found is to use a "go-no-go" template like others have mentioned.

    I have found that the larger Titan chuck can be put to good use, as it has more range of movement.

    One other thing, I was shown this at a demo, I'm not sure it if was Eli Avisera or Jean-Francois Escoulen who showed us, but you really do want your tenon size to be as close to the minimum sized the specific jaw set will hold, as the closer the jaws are to a perfect circle the stronger the hold will be on the tenon, and the less vibration you will get, thus, I use about a 2 1/4" tenon with the 50 mm jaw set on the G3 chuck I have, and if I'm working larger wood, then I switch to the Titan, and a different set of jaws, 3 1/4" tenon, Titan and the 75mm bowl jaws, 4" tenon, Titan and the 100mm bowl jaws, 5" tenon, Titan and the Titan power grip jaws.

    My point is that just because the jaws will open to a max size, does not mean that you should use that sized tenon. I think you are further ahead by sizing your tenons to the jaw sets you have, not the other way around.

    Just what works for me.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

Similar Threads

  1. SuperNova2 chucks on sale at AMZ $119
    By Ryan Mooney in forum Hot Deals
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-04-2015, 03:51 PM
  2. Supernova2 or oneway
    By Rich Soby in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 09-19-2011, 04:49 PM
  3. first chuck question...
    By Ned Bulken in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-19-2008, 08:25 PM
  4. Chuck question
    By Westley Rosenbaum in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-14-2008, 02:56 AM
  5. SuperNova2 jaw source
    By Chip Charnley in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-19-2007, 05:42 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •