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Thread: Green wood

  1. #1

    Green wood

    I am new to woodturning and have read that you should turn green wood then let it dry for 1-3 months and then finish turning it. I was wondering how far do you go turning the first time and is there any way to help prevent cracking on a piece that has been turned over the entire surface and there is no bark left?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Remlik, Virginia
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    88
    Quote Originally Posted by curtis tolbert View Post
    I am new to woodturning and have read that you should turn green wood then let it dry for 1-3 months and then finish turning it. I was wondering how far do you go turning the first time and is there any way to help prevent cracking on a piece that has been turned over the entire surface and there is no bark left?
    For rough turning the general rule of thumb is 1" for every 10" in diameter. I have used this gauge with good results with most wood. I Anchor Seal the end grain, the rim and then wrap in a paper bag and forget about it for about a year. There is no way it would air dry in several months in my shop. Of course you could just turn the green wood to finished thickness

    The environment in which the roughed out bowl will be kept has a lot to do with the success. In shops like mine in Eastern VA with no climate control I have a very high success rate. In drier areas and controlled environments it is a little more uncertain as often the relative humidity is lower.

    There are many other options including denatured alcohol drying, boiling, covering with shavings, plastic bag drying, microwave drying and I even heard of one guy who uses cardboard boxes. also you could build a kiln.

    The best approach is to do a number of searches.
    Barbara

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
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    4,834
    I agree with Barbara. The one thing I think you will find is if you don't use like the DNA (denatured alcohol soak) it is going to be longer that 1 to 3 months. I have did several like that before I started the DNA soak and it is like 12 to 18 months depending on thickness. With the DNA soak it is like 2 to 3 weeks.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  4. #4
    Thanks for the info. Where can I get more info on the dna soak? I searched this site and could not find anything?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    Curtis, Dave Smith did a lot of testing and put his results in this article.

    http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_473.shtml

    A lot of people follow his methods (or some variant of it) and get good results.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
    Thanks Vaughn. Thats a lot of good information! Yesterday I turned a vase (outside only) out if oak. It is about 12" high and 4" thick at top and bottom. I brought it into the house and this morning it had already cracked in several places.
    Last edited by curtis tolbert; 06-13-2008 at 11:36 AM.

  7. #7
    Does anyone know if isopropyl alcohol will suffice? I have several bottles already.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Drums, PA
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    292
    Quote Originally Posted by curtis tolbert View Post
    Does anyone know if isopropyl alcohol will suffice? I have several bottles already.
    Most isopropyl contains 30% water, most DNA is in the mid 90%. It's likely the alcohol you have has too much water.

    Now if you have some moonshine hanging around, that might work.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Sardo View Post
    Most isopropyl contains 30% water, most DNA is in the mid 90%. It's likely the alcohol you have has too much water.

    Now if you have some moonshine hanging around, that might work.
    Yeah, right off the still, uncut, it would work, but man, what a waste of moonshine
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    If I had moonshine it would probably go straight to my gas tank!

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