Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Deck over a slab

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    22

    Deck over a slab

    I have some questions for you guys,
    Heres the situation, Im getting ready to put sod down in my backyard, and already have flower beds and all that good stuff, but all I have is a 12x13 slab of concrete that is pretty bad looking. I also added some pavers to make the slab a little bigger and give me some room for my grill, the pavers are in there with a sand/topping mix that gets pretty hard and these will not be easy to remove if thats what I want to do, they are bordered by 4x4's, the extra paver patio makes the total slab about 12 x 19. And these pavers are not perfectly level. So my idea was to put a small low deck directly over the concrete slab, I think this would just add a lot to the yard. So heres what I was thinking about doing. First I would put down several 2x4's running perpendicular to the house, I was thinking using a Powder Actuated nailer, Then I would put (5/4 x 6 x not sure yet) over the 2x4's. I think this would work fine and probably be able to get done in no time at all, but I dont want to only do this over the original slab, I want to make it big enough to actually use, but I am not sure what to do about the pavers and how I should go over these, I dont want to spend a ton of money on this project, but I want it to look good and do it right. Any suggestions on what you guys think I should do. Thanks a ton!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Puyallup, WA
    Posts
    330
    What's the height differential between the threshold of the door and the ground?
    And what part of the country are you located in?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    WNY, Buffalo Area
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Rathe View Post
    I have some questions for you guys,
    Heres the situation, Im getting ready to put sod down in my backyard, and already have flower beds and all that good stuff, but all I have is a 12x13 slab of concrete that is pretty bad looking. I also added some pavers to make the slab a little bigger and give me some room for my grill, the pavers are in there with a sand/topping mix that gets pretty hard and these will not be easy to remove if thats what I want to do, they are bordered by 4x4's, the extra paver patio makes the total slab about 12 x 19. And these pavers are not perfectly level. So my idea was to put a small low deck directly over the concrete slab, I think this would just add a lot to the yard. So heres what I was thinking about doing. First I would put down several 2x4's running perpendicular to the house, I was thinking using a Powder Actuated nailer, Then I would put (5/4 x 6 x not sure yet) over the 2x4's. I think this would work fine and probably be able to get done in no time at all, but I dont want to only do this over the original slab, I want to make it big enough to actually use, but I am not sure what to do about the pavers and how I should go over these, I dont want to spend a ton of money on this project, but I want it to look good and do it right. Any suggestions on what you guys think I should do. Thanks a ton!

    Mike,

    Having built a low level deck myself I can try to offer some suggestions. Before I start, I have a question for you. Were abouts do you live? I don't need the exact location, but state, provence, region, or city/town would be helpful. My reasoning is that depending on where you are and your winter weather, will impact your foundation options/choices. Also are you planning on attaching this deck to your house or not?

    Let me know and I will offer what I can.

    Below is the link to my posting on my deck.
    http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...ead.php?t=2970
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    22
    Well, I live in Columbia, South Carolina, so we really dont have bad winters at all, and the slab to my door is 2 1/2 inches, thanks guys

  5. #5
    IMHO... I have built a gallery of Decks in my time (having spent my summers buiding decks to make ends meet. and after retirement I built two for my son and 3 for my daughter and several for friends. ) I are well versed in the act of deckdom, but would prefer for your application a more solid foundation such as new concrete or Pavers or flaggs or tile over the high maintainance of Decking. Remember that in the hot humid area you live the sun will bake the deck as well as the intense heat will cook all moisture out. Although you don't have the winter freeze and upheaval that those of use in God's country endure, you have some intense summer weather to endure.

    Iffin' it were me.... I would either replace the concrete (at about the same coast of a new deck or less) use decorative tile, or sand bed with Pavers, or textured concrete, and have a very low maintainance patio in lieu of the high maintainance decking of either wood or composite.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Puyallup, WA
    Posts
    330
    I too have built more then my share of decks and I'm with Bill on this one. I would add to Bill's comments an additional concern about using 2"x4"s for the joists.

    Stained, stamped concrete really looks great and is much easier to maintain.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    2,323
    Hi Mike,
    The guys offer some good suggestions but you live there and know how much trouble it would be to go concrete with the existing conditions. The concern over the 2x4 joist is real, unless you attach, during leveling, a leg to the ground rather often. You could use landscape timbers as legs and nail them to the 2x4 through the 2x4 side, or just lay a scrap piece of 2x4 on the ground, next to the joist and nail. I use 16 penny hot dipped galvanized for this purpose. you may have to clamp the leg while nailing to keep it snug against the 2x4.
    The landscape timbers can be cut on a miter box. I even use the landscape timbers as cross members between joists on some occasions, easy to hit with the nails and relatively cheap too.
    Keep us posted and good luck.
    Shaz
    I am a registered voter and you can be too. We ( registered voters ) select the moderators for this forum by voting every six months for the people we want to watch over this family forum.
    Please join me. Register now.
    Shaz
    Here is how

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,321
    From your description, it seems that you'd have to lay the 2 X 4's flat on the slab, and then lay the 5/4 decking over them, for a total thickness of right at 2˝ inches. That means there'd be no 'stepdown' from the inside of your house to the deck.

    You'd have to fasten the pressure treated 2 X 4's directly to the concrete - probably using Tapcons® or a powder actuated nailer.

    On the part over the pavers, you might need to remove a few pavers, dig down a foot or so, and pour some concrete footer blocks to support the 2 X 4's.

    Overall, it doesn't sound like a good idea. The lack of stepdown could cause water problems in the house, and the overall longevity of the deck would be way less than a replacement slab - even with regular maintenance.

    Seems like you'd be better off jackhammering up the old slab, removing the old pavers, and pouring a new slab the size you want. You could always dye and/or texture the new slab.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim DeLaney View Post
    From your description, it seems that you'd have to lay the 2 X 4's flat on the slab, and then lay the 5/4 decking over them, for a total thickness of right at 2˝ inches. That means there'd be no 'stepdown' from the inside of your house to the deck.

    You'd have to fasten the pressure treated 2 X 4's directly to the concrete - probably using Tapcons® or a powder actuated nailer.

    On the part over the pavers, you might need to remove a few pavers, dig down a foot or so, and pour some concrete footer blocks to support the 2 X 4's.

    Overall, it doesn't sound like a good idea. The lack of stepdown could cause water problems in the house, and the overall longevity of the deck would be way less than a replacement slab - even with regular maintenance.

    Seems like you'd be better off jackhammering up the old slab, removing the old pavers, and pouring a new slab the size you want. You could always dye and/or texture the new slab.
    I'd sure like to see some pictures of the existing deck etc.

    I basically agree with Jim, I think you would be ahead, to remove the existing slab, and then you could either make a new wooden or concrete deck.

    I certainly understand the want to use what you got, and having to break up the old slab and haul it away is a LOT of work, not fun work either, I know, I've done a few.

    I would look at a new deck, with a proper foundation, and then put some of that wood like stuff, as a wooden deck is a lot of work to keep up.

    Good luck with it, take pictures!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    4,268
    Looks like Jim was the only other one that picked up on that height and that you were planning on laying down the tooby's. Jim hit on most everything I was thinking about. As a home Inspector I see a lot of rotten door frames at decks because of water splattering from them onto and into the door. Raising it up that high is really going to increase that possibility.

    I think this is a bad idea. Time to back up and look at other options.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

Similar Threads

  1. Deck Refinish
    By Paul Douglass in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-05-2012, 09:55 PM
  2. Deck rejuvenation
    By Rob Keeble in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-10-2011, 04:21 PM
  3. New Deck Build
    By Bill Arnold in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-12-2010, 12:52 PM
  4. Deck piers
    By Mike Gabbay in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-28-2008, 01:57 PM
  5. My Deck Project
    By Sean Wright in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-29-2007, 03:47 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •