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Thread: Looking for a good Miter saw for finish trim work

  1. #1

    Looking for a good Miter saw for finish trim work

    I am looking for a quality saw that I can use on site to do architectural mouldings and trim work. Saw has to be durable and accurate. Dust collection is important but not a deal breaker. Give me your recommendations

    Greg
    Self employed Saw Dust Sweeper.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Tokiwadai, Japan
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    Greg,

    Great to talk to you again.... Hope to see a post of how you like the Kapex, if that's what you decide to get. I hope others will jump in and give you some other options.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    The Heart of Dixie
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    I would jump in but I don't use miter saw to speak of. I have a Delta Shop master that does just fine for the rare time I use it.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    oswego county , upstate n.y.
    Posts
    280
    hi greg ,

    the bosch 4410L keeps getting rave reviews over the past few years since its debut . its also one of the more expensive models on the market.

    if it were my hard earned money i would give it a serious look.

    i would also look very hard at makita , ridgid, hitachi. i would also ask if you need a slider ? the fixed ones are better in the long run. the 12" fixed ones are very close in capacity to the 10" sliders . i will be watching to see what you decide on , please let us all know
    what are you building today ??

    GRIZZLY

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    We now divide our time between southwest Florida and southwest Vermont.
    Posts
    137

    Makita LS1013FL

    I am at the early stages of setting up my shop, but I recently bought the Makita and used it to install about 1000 square feet of flooring and associated baseboard moldings. I have not used it for crown molding, but I purchased the optional right side subfence in anticipation of doing some.

    I have had excellent results so far. Cuts have been clean and accurate with the stock blade, and I haven't had any alignment issues. I'm anxious to see how it does with the Chopmaster blade.

    I suspect it's not the equal of a Festool saw, but I have no complaints.

    Tony
    The optimist says the glass is half full.
    The pessimist says it's half empty.
    I say the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ozarks
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    4,993
    greg,
    any name brand 10" slider will work well for you.....the 12" units tend to have some blade wobble when cutting large crown in position.
    i like to remove the guard so i can better see the cut line, if you do this too then pay close attention to how the guard is mounted, some are a real bugger to remove!
    dust collection for a chopsaw is only a dream (although maybe festool has solved it?)
    i use milwaukees saws.
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    WNY, Buffalo Area
    Posts
    873
    I have a DeWalt DW705. It is a single bevel 12in compound mitre saw. I replaced the insert with a shop made ZCI, for straight cross cuts. This has helped make the cuts cleaner - less tearout. The dust collection with the stock dust bag, is better not nothing, but not that good. I found when I hooked it up to my shop vac it does much better. I'm sure the Kapex is alot better, but for over $1200, I would hope that it would be.

    I do wish it had a Laser guide, but they weren't standard when I bought it several years ago. I know Irwin has an after market one, that I might try at some point.

    I have the Cut-n-Crown jigs for crown molding. I have to pin the guard back inorder to us this jig. It is pretty scarry to see that "12in wheel of amputation" spinning right in front of your face.
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Greg,

    I've got a dw708. You can't buy them anymore, so it's not a recommendation. Dust collection is a joke. But...

    I've got the irwin after-market laser on there, and have it mounted on the ridgid mobile stand. The thing's a dream for everything from trim work to fence building. If I had the money, I'd get the kapex... but the one I have is good enough that I don't long for something else. Just don't try to do picture frames with it!

    Thanks,

    Bill

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    WNY, Buffalo Area
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Lantry View Post
    Greg,

    I've got a dw708. You can't buy them anymore, so it's not a recommendation. Dust collection is a joke. But...

    I've got the irwin after-market laser on there, and have it mounted on the ridgid mobile stand. The thing's a dream for everything from trim work to fence building. If I had the money, I'd get the kapex... but the one I have is good enough that I don't long for something else. Just don't try to do picture frames with it!

    Thanks,

    Bill
    Bill,

    How do you like the Irwin laser? Was it hard to intstall? Do you find that it is accurate? What is the battery life on it?

    Thanks!
    We create with our hands in wood what our mind sees in thought.
    Disclosure: Formerly was a part-time sales person & instructor at WoodCraft in Buffalo, NY.
    www.tinyurl.com/thewoodshoppe

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inside the Beltway
    Posts
    2,666
    How do you like the Irwin laser?

    It does improve accuracy and confidence.

    Was it hard to install?

    Hey, even *I* could do it! Enuff said!

    Do you find that it is accurate?


    Well, that depends. For framing and trim work, it's da bomb. For fine woodworking, it's pretty much worthless. It'll get you within about a 64th... beyond that, you're on your own.

    What is the battery life on it?

    Don't know. About two years, so far. Fair warning... lots of people don't like it because it doesn't turn on till you spin the blade. I don't mind: I spin, readjust the workpiece, spin, lower the blade. For 19 bucks, it's easily worth it, just because it saves so much time. I used to fiddle a lot on each cut. Now, I don't need to...

    Thanks,

    Bill

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