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Thread: My first turned mallet

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Austin TX
    Posts
    405

    My first turned mallet

    Hey everyone,

    Unfortunately, my camera was elsewhere when I was getting ready to start this mallet so I didn't get any "before" pictures. I saw a piece of Burmese Rosewood at the local Woodcraft store that, even though it was covered in wax, had some really interesting markings. It started as a 3" x 3" x 12" block of wood. I still only have a small lathe, a Jet 1220, and I'm still really green in the turning world but keep getting my feet wet trying to learn new skills. One of my friends loves to turn mallets, as I found out last week, and after seeing all of the different sized ones he has in his shop I thought I might as well give it a try. The rosewood was not extremely wet but was still slightly damp. Again one of my first turnings I've done with wood that is not dry. I turned to shape last night and put some paste wax on the ends just in case it still had too much moisture that could cause it to crack. Today I put it back on the lathe to change the shape a little (head seemed to rectangular). I applied some Neutral color Black Bison furniture wax and then buffed it when dried. I've attached a couple of photos of the completed mallet. Feel free to comment as I find that one of the best ways for me to learn.

    Regards,
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Burmese Rosewood mallet.jpg   Burmese Rosewood Mallet head.jpg  
    Lee Laird
    Austin TX

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    613
    Lee, we started all at the same way, in the begin is everything new, you have to explore and practice, but for sofar as you said about yourself that you are a ''newbie'', your mallet looks very good, anyway better than my first turning. Try to figure out what for you the most comfortable way is to do your turnings.
    Well done!
    Ad

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Austin TX
    Posts
    405
    Ad,

    Thanks for the encouragement. The only turning I have done prior to buying the little lathe was on my dad's metal lathe. And you could count the number of times on that on one hand. It's amazing watching some of the better turners (to me that would be most turners <grin>). They seem to remove wood effortlessly and with such good results. I'd like to think I might be there someday. Practice, read/watch a video, practice...

    Take care,
    Lee Laird
    Austin TX

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
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    Very nice, Lee. It looks comfortable to use, and the wood's gorgeous.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Catalunya
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    4,632
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Laird View Post

    It's amazing watching some of the better turners (to me that would be most turners <grin>). They seem to remove wood effortlessly and with such good results.
    ,
    Don't be afraid, Lee, those guys do it to show off and scare newbbies, but in fact those videos are played a twice the speed, when one gets to know them they are a fantastic bunch of people

    I love your mallet, how much does it weigh?
    Best regards,
    Toni

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    I also dream of a shop with north light where my hands can be busy, my soul rest and my mind wander...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Tokyo Japan
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    15,808
    Good work Lee, that should last a long time!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Austin TX
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    Toni,

    Thanks for the kind words about the mallet and the advice. Good to know.

    I'll guess my mallet weighs about 1 - 1 1/2 lbs. My accurate scale is not available. I'll see if I can get an exact weight tomorrow. With it being my first mallet, I had to guess what would feel good in the hand and in use. I took it out of the lathe and tried to see what it felt like, but it still had extra material at both ends. I just measured the mallet and it's 9 1/2" long and the head is about 3 1/8" at the largest point. I guess the size on the label was off so it must have been closer to 4" x 4" before I got started. Maybe with the dimensions and knowing the wood you might be better at estimating weight than I??

    Thanks again,
    Lee Laird
    Austin TX

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Austin TX
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    405
    Stu,

    Thanks. I sure hope so. Even though it is a beginner's form, I still enjoyed the heck out of making it. Wish I had your skills. This rosewood finished so wonderfully with little effort. Funny, when I showed my wife and daughter, they each independently remarked it felt "soft". First time to use this type of wood, but after this I may have to get some more! I don't know how much this wood would cost in Japan, but I got it for about $18.

    With a dark dense wood like this, what would you use to mark it as made by me, wood type and date? I've been trying to do this with the dovetailed boxes and furniture I make.

    Take care,
    Lee Laird
    Austin TX

  9. #9
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    Austin TX
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    Vaughn,

    I guess I'll have to use it sometime. Funny how the end product can actually make you wonder if you REALLY want to put dents and / or dings into it. Sure not something that ever crossed my mind when I was buying this lump of wood. Hope this doesn't come across as if I'm tooting my own horn. Not at all what is intended. Just so happens that Mother Nature did a great job with the colors on this piece of wood and I lucked into showing them.

    Thanks for the kind words,
    Lee Laird
    Austin TX

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Laird View Post
    ...Funny how the end product can actually make you wonder if you REALLY want to put dents and / or dings into it...
    I can fully understand. I've made some cutting boards that aren't likely to ever see the edge of a knife.

    On the other hand, a while back I made a lathe tool handle out of cocobolo, some really pretty stuff that shined up great. Almost too nice to use. But now that I've used it some, it has a few bumps and dings, but it's still a joy to use it every time I pick it up. I'd bet the pleasure from using the mallet will far outweigh the pain of seeing a few superficial "character marks" in the surface.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

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