Are There Tables to Invert Circular Saws into Table Saws?

Messages
64
Location
Tennessee
This doesn't sound safe to me, but I've heard tell of plans for a table that helps convert a circular saw into a table saw...

I've been digging into this in response to this question:
Does anyone make a table to mount and hold a circular saw inverted so it could be used as a temporary table saw?
I'm dubious, but wanted to get your collective opinion.

Also, would that be called a jig or a table?
 
To borrow a phrase from Ralph Nader, UNSAFE AT ANY SPEED:eek: :eek: :eek:

If you need to make straight cuts and don't have a table saw, try the 'guided circular saw" technique. Simplest thing to do is to start with a board a little longer than the stock you will be cutting. Main thing is that one side of that board needs to be good and straight. A 1x4 is fine, nothing too tall as part of the saw will ride over it.

Glue a piece of hardboard, mdf, ply -whatever to that board so that it sticks out 4 or 5 inches. When its dry, run your saw over it, keeping the edge of the saw against the straight board. This is will cut a straight line thru the bottom board. That new edge on the bottom board is now your guide. Just line it up over the line you draw for the cut on your stock. Clamp it down and cut away. Should be nice, clean and straight.

Here's a pic of one I made a few years ago out of two pieces of scrap.
 

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M Toupin

Member
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193
Location
37° 5'16.25"N 76°25'28.11"W
Popular Mechanics had a plan some time back for a setup like you describe. It was based on a table with drop in inserts for a circular saw, jig saw and router with provisions for a fence system and DC IIRC. It was probably 10 years or more ago, might check their website or the library for old copies on microfilm.

I can't see it being very accurate, but I don't see anything inherently dangerous with it as long as everything is held tight. After all a table saw is nothing more than a motor with a blade suspended under a table.. With the self retracting blade guard it might be kinda neat.:D

Mike
 
I can't see it being very accurate, but I don't see anything inherently dangerous with it as long as everything is held tight. After all a table saw is nothing more than a motor with a blade suspended under a table.. With the self retracting blade guard it might be kinda neat.:D

Mike

I would be concerned that there is presumably no height adjustment and no splitter. How would you keep it turned on - tape the trigger shut?? The retractable blade guard seems to me like kickback waiting to happen.

My two cents...
 

Ian Gillis

Member
Messages
443
Location
Nova Scotia's beautiful south shore
These things were all over the place in the 50's. Skimpy little sheet metal or aluminum tables. They were a compromise at best.

An old carpenter friend of mine told me that when the first circular saws came out they were often fitted under a wooden table table and used as cut-off saws. They used a foot pedal to lift the saw.

He offered me his original saw from the 30's (iirc) sucker must have weighed 20 lbs !! Kinda wish I'd taken it, but you have to draw the line somewhere.
 

M Toupin

Member
Messages
193
Location
37° 5'16.25"N 76°25'28.11"W
Circular saws have a depth setting, it's just upside down on this setup. PITA yes, but functional. With a little bit of ingenuity a splitter could be added just like the home brew splitters added to 100s of table saws. We're talking a 7 1/4" circular saw here, I don't think kick back is going to be a catastrophic event like a 5hp TS. You're more than likely to stall the saw out before you get a kickback. I think we can agree there are better tools available, but in a situation were portability is a factor it would get the job done. I admire the farm brand ingenuity myself.

Mike

I would be concerned that there is presumably no height adjustment and no splitter. How would you keep it turned on - tape the trigger shut?? The retractable blade guard seems to me like kickback waiting to happen.

My two cents...
 
Messages
64
Location
Tennessee
Interesting approach M Toupin - I think that could work for someone with the wherewithal to do it well...

My reply to our questioner will lean towards NOT home brew rigging something like this up, but that if they absolutely insist that they should add a splitter.

I didn't get a good read from their question, but I *think* they were just asking as a way to avoid the cost of buying a table saw rather than for increased portability.

Still, you never really know what to recommend for sure until you know the job I guess...

Thank you guys - this was really helpful.

G
 

Dan McGuire

Member
Messages
41
Location
Plainfield, IL
If I remember correctly, my father had such a device back in the 70's. It was made by Hirsch. It looked like a workmate with a rectangular hole to mount the saw. It even had a slot plowed down either side for the miter gauge.
 

Don Baer

Moderator
Staff member
Garret,
I think a little more info from the poster might help. If he wants to cut streight line then a saw guide like jesse suggested is a great way to go. If he doesn't want to make one then he can purchase on for less then $20 from either home Depot or Lowes. They both carry em. I boght one over 30 years ago and just finaly got rid of it because it got damaged when I moved. I bought another one to replace it. It's great for breaking down sheet good and much safer then a table saw for this operation.
 
Messages
64
Location
Tennessee
Don I wrote to ask for more details from our questioner...

Jesse your ideas about making long straight cuts with a circular saw look good... I will pass that along too.

Thank you!

G
 

tod evans

Member
Messages
4,993
Location
ozarks
guided circular saws are inexpensive and so are the disposa-saws marketed in home centers.....if the fellow just needs a few boards cut surely there`s a neighbor who owns a saw? if not ask just how much his fingers are worth? tod
 

Doug Shepard

In Memorium
Messages
773
Location
Waterford, MI
If I remember correctly, my father had such a device back in the 70's. It was made by Hirsch. It looked like a workmate with a rectangular hole to mount the saw. It even had a slot plowed down either side for the miter gauge.

That may have been the one my dad had too. I dont remember it fondly.
 

Bruce Page

Member
Messages
1,099
Location
Albuquerque, New Mexico
I bought one from Monkey-Wards about 35 years ago, long before I knew what brains were... It was similar to some of today's cheap bench top router tables, but much more scary. :eek: :eek:
A straight edge is a much better way to go.
 

Joe Mioux

Member
Messages
351
Location
Carlyle IL
Yes there are plans for this.

I used to own the plans, but I have no idea what I did with them. somebody had a whole workshop of stationary tools built around fixing hand tools to a fixed base.

Looked to Rube Goldbergish for me.

Joe
 

peter rehberg

Member
Messages
2
saw table

Yes there is or was . It was made by The Hirsch Co. and was a really neat piece. It took a circular saw and router. Very sturdy, foldable, and very well designed. Oh and contrary to opinion VERY SAFE. used it for many years and many projects, including a great `little house on prairie`style sideboard hutch that i still have nearly 30 years after I built it. And I still have all my fingers! Never had any problems using it though I would`nt use it to build a house it was great for construction projects around the house. You can still find them out there, I found one on another site and am waiting to see if the guy has all the parts and what kind of price he going to want. I bought it for 60 bucks from Home Hardware, and yeays later I saw it in Sears and they wanted like 149. Look around on the internet. ONe word of advice If you find one dont leave the tool attached for long periods of time, the only critique i have is the table is made of MDF and a heavy 7 inch circular will cause the table to sag slightly after a few months. Other than that a really good piece.
 

peter rehberg

Member
Messages
2
yes it is made or was made by hirsch. excellent table wouldnt use to build a house but very well designed and it worked really well. You can still find them used if you look hard enough. Contrary to comments here it's very very safe to use. Wish i still had it , still scouring the internet and yard sales for 1 at the right price with all the attachements. Mine was stolen from a shop i would use sometimes for larger projects.
 
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