Best way to assemble chipboard.

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5,625
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Catalunya
Hi guys.
I am on the process of designing a flip cart to hold my spindle sander and my benchtop router ( that I also have to refurbish). I have enough salvaged material of chipboard of 20mm (0.78") thickness with melamine on both sides. The cart will look as on the attached quick sketch (not drawn the details yet) but I would like to know what sort of assembling sistem should I use, screws, screws and dowels or other?. (I don't have a biscuit jointer machine so that's out of the way).
I fear of not making it strong enough, I am being too cautious?
Any suggestion will be appreciated.
Thanks in advance.

This is the rough sketch of the cart, and how it wil flip
flip cart.jpgflip cart 3.jpg

This is the body without the machines and the turning base. On the bottom I would like to have a drawer to put the different accesoires of the machines.
The cubes simulating legs are going to be the wheels to move it around. I've drawn them so that I could figure out at what height would get both working surfaces of the machines.
flip cart2.jpg
 

John Bartley

Member
Messages
889
In the commercial cabinet shop where I spent a couple of part time years (with great enjoyment), we built a LOT of particle board cabinets, mostly for commercial installations (schools, gov't offices, etc). Our method was to pre-cut all the panels, then assemble them by tacking a pair of panels together with a couple of brad nails and finish with countersunk screws .... no biscuits, no dowels, no splines .... just brad and screw.

Your cabinet will need a bit more ruggedness. and when we needed that level of ruggedness we used white PVA glue. We found that if we ran a glue line of white PVA glue along each joint prior to the brad & screw process, once that glue dried we could take out the screws and we'd have to break the particle board to get the cabinet apart ...... white PVA glue is stronger than the wood it welds together.

NOTE : there is also a PVA glue for joining melamine coated panels, but the strongest joint will come from running a slight rabbet (essentially removing the melamine layer) prior to gluing.
 
Messages
5,625
Location
Catalunya
In the commercial cabinet shop where I spent a couple of part time years (with great enjoyment), we built a LOT of particle board cabinets, mostly for commercial installations (schools, gov't offices, etc). Our method was to pre-cut all the panels, then assemble them by tacking a pair of panels together with a couple of brad nails and finish with countersunk screws .... no biscuits, no dowels, no splines .... just brad and screw.

Your cabinet will need a bit more ruggedness. and when we needed that level of ruggedness we used white PVA glue. We found that if we ran a glue line of white PVA glue along each joint prior to the brad & screw process, once that glue dried we could take out the screws and we'd have to break the particle board to get the cabinet apart ...... white PVA glue is stronger than the wood it welds together.

NOTE : there is also a PVA glue for joining melamine coated panels, but the strongest joint will come from running a slight rabbet (essentially removing the melamine layer) prior to gluing.
Thanks a lot John, I had never thought about removing a strip of melamine equal to the thickness of the board that goes perpendicular to it. That makes a lot of sense. Would you remove it with a router or just pry it off?
 

John Bartley

Member
Messages
889
Thanks a lot John, I had never thought about removing a strip of melamine equal to the thickness of the board that goes perpendicular to it. That makes a lot of sense. Would you remove it with a router or just pry it off?
Typically, melamine is pretty thin, so a dado blade set on the tablesaw or an end cutting router bit and a straightedge both work well. We used the router and straightedge.
 
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