Cherry

steve ramsey

Member
Messages
367
Location
Lafayette, IN
Just cut down a cherry that was dead and close to the shop. I am curious about everyone opinion as to the best way to prep these for turning. 0326201411.jpg
Sizes range from +/-12" to 18" . Seems like there are as many options as there are turners as to the best storage method. I do not have a kiln so that option is out and don't really have room to store them inside but I may have to make room. At a minimum I think I need to cut them vertically to sizes for bowls and paint the ends. What are everyone's thoughts.
 

Ryan Mooney

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
6,781
Location
The Gorge Area, Oregon
Here's what I do:

Cut the blanks on each side of the pith something about like the below but adjust to size and inclusions as appropriate... Leave them all a bit long so you can trim any checking off of the ends when you rough the blanks. Paint the ends if you can find it wax is best (anchorseal & friends), latex works ok ish (two coats). If painted try to keep them fully covered to slow down drying. I'm on the fence about removing bark but have generally concluded that it's likely better once the logs are cut into coarse blanks. Alternatively if you have a place to do it you can soak either the cut-offs or even the whole logs in water until ready to turn them that also works pretty well (I reckon if I had a pond of any size.. it would be a weird place..).


1585251193821.png
 

Vaughn McMillan

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
33,951
Location
ABQ NM
I do essentially what Ryan suggested, although the strips next to the pith can be used for pepper mills or other spindle projects. For example, I made this fireplace poker handle out of some wood from that part of a sycamore log.

Jeff's Poker 23.jpg
 

Vaughn McMillan

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
33,951
Location
ABQ NM
Oh yeah I wasn't suggesting to toss those strips :eek::eek:
Yeah, I meant to say "also be used" (in addition to the shallow bowls/platters indicated in the illustration). There's a lot you can do with those chunks. One of my other 3" or 4" thick sycamore pith slices (with the pith still in it) is next to my sister and brother-in-law's wood stove, used as a chopping block for making kindling and splitting small logs. If it eventually cracks in two down the center, they can split it into smaller pieces and burn it, too. :thumb:
 
Last edited:

steve ramsey

Member
Messages
367
Location
Lafayette, IN
Here's what I do:

Cut the blanks on each side of the pith something about like the below but adjust to size and inclusions as appropriate... Leave them all a bit long so you can trim any checking off of the ends when you rough the blanks. Paint the ends if you can find it wax is best (anchorseal & friends), latex works ok ish (two coats). If painted try to keep them fully covered to slow down drying. I'm on the fence about removing bark but have generally concluded that it's likely better once the logs are cut into coarse blanks. Alternatively if you have a place to do it you can soak either the cut-offs or even the whole logs in water until ready to turn them that also works pretty well (I reckon if I had a pond of any size.. it would be a weird place..).


View attachment 110135
Thanks Ryan. This is what I also found researching what needed to be done that makes the most sense, reducing the cross sectional area to reduce shrinkage. I do have a water garden that is about 14 x 16 x 2 feet deep. I am afraid though if I filled it with wood the LOML would cut off the proverbial tallywacker so I'll stick with covering it.
 

Ryan Mooney

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
6,781
Location
The Gorge Area, Oregon
Yeah you're actually mostly trying to prevent radial cracking, hence removing the center. I have a small fish pond that I would similarly fear to use in such a fashion.
 
Top