Craftsman/Emerson 113.27520 Tune Up

glenn bradley

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A thread about a hand-me-down Skil brand job-site saw started to wander (my fault) into the reviving of my grandfather's 113.-saw. To try to make the info more accessible to future visitors I am starting this thread. Quick recap: Grandpa's saw, bought new around 1950-52. Was handed down to my father and in turn to me. It has been stored, unused since about 2005. Dad and I got bored and decided it was time to breathe some new life into this rugged little contractor format saw.

First off, this is what one looks like. King Seeley made a very similar saw for Craftsman (models starting with 103.)
Front-4-web.jpg
It's nice to have the original accessories all intact.
113.27520-accessories.jpg
I put dad to work blowing out the body.
Dad cleaning up.jpg
It is amazing how smoothly all the height and tilt functions work. We cleaned off any hard packed saw dust. Old grease wasn't a problem since grandpa and dad both followed the manual and lubricated conservatively with "SAE 20 or 30". The factory bearings were a bit rough. Even though they "have been packed at the factory and require no additional lubrication" I seriously doubt that the original spec required 70 years of service.

Woe is me. The arbor did not want to jump right out of the casting after all these years. I am not the person you want working on your car but, machines in general and I tend to get along. A little heat on the casting, not the arbor, and a tap from a heavy mallet and she came right out.
Arbor parts actual-1.jpg
I was confused for a bit on getting the second bearing off. A thread over on Lumberjocks helped as the author had rebuilt this same model saw. A puller removed the press-fit flange and then the bearing.
Arbor parts actual-2.jpg
No bearings available locally. Such suppliers, like motor repair shops, have become rare as hen's teeth once you are out of the city centers. Amazon to the rescue; $10 and a pair will arrive sometime today.

A challenge not directly associated with the saw rebuild is a motor, stand and making it mobile. I had picked up one of Rockler's All Terrain Mobile Base units during one of their garage sales for half price. Now it has a purpose ;-)
All Terrain Base.jpg
The saw body will bolt to a simple plywood box made from scraps. The box will bolt to the mobile base.
113.Base.jpg
I'll update later once something more interesting happens.
 

glenn bradley

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The base is sanded and shellacked. I flip it upside down on the one clear spot on the bench and set the mobile base on top . . . or bottom in this case.
All Terrain Base-2.jpg
I drill 5/16" through holes for the 5/16" carriage bolts. I drill the metal to 3/8" to allow the carriage bolt shoulder to jam into it. Fender washer and nut on the inside. The magnet from an old hard drive catches the metal spoil and makes it easy to clean up.
All Terrain Base-3.jpg
With the plywood base bolted to the mobile base it is starting to look like something. I will cut a hole in the top since the saw carriage has a blade shroud (cast iron) that directs spoil out the bottom of the saw body.
All Terrain Base-4.jpg
The opening will be on the saw’s left side and allows access for the DC hose. It will also hold the guard and miter gauge till I have a better home for them. I have a 'big gulp' DC fixture that I plan to fasten below which will terminate in a 4" port. This should allow spoil to fall out via gravity when a DC is not in use which will be the order of the day for some months yet. This saw is just a band-aid but, if it earns its keep once the shop is further along I will make the DC connections more elegant and possible add a drawer or two. Time will tell.
 
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glenn bradley

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I rarely do this :rolleyes:BUT, I failed to check the I.D. of the bearings. They are 6202's and even bear the Craftsman part # 3509. Unfortunately the I.D. is a fat 32nd of an inch too small; probably 15mm instead of .625 inches. The good news is that it is a "no return refund" on Amazon so it saves me a trip to the UPS store.

I tried a couple of auto parts stores but, they have the same metric to imperial problem. Ordered different ones from Amazon with a posted bore of .625. they show up tomorrow so it is hard to complain . It just stings knowing that if I would have checked them on arrival the replacements would already be here ;-(
 
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glenn bradley

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Bearings arrived. These are interference fit so a good cleaning of the receiver was in order. The fit was still tighter than I wanted to force. I also didn't feel like pulling the trunnions to get access to press things in. I took a page out of the old "how to do it without special tools" manual. I put the bearings in the freezer and washed the casting with the flame from a propane torch till water sprinkles quickly disappeared when spritzed on it. Turn off the torch, fetch the bearings out of the freeser and they pop right in. Fifteen or twenty minutes later they are nice and tight.
Granpas-saw-done-1.jpg . Granpas-saw-done-2.jpg
Everything is staged to go together. Everyone who said having one of those hydraulic tables from Horror Fright was right. What a back saver; it paid for itself a long time ago but, just this would have done it ;-)
Granpas-saw-done-3.jpg
Ready for a test run. Man I wish modern miter gauges fit as well as this older one.
Granpas-saw-done-4.jpg
Grandpa would be proud of his little saw.
Granpas-saw-done-5.jpg
Dust port worked out well.
Granpas-saw-done-6.jpg
Seems to have plenty of power.
Granpas-saw-done-7.jpg
I have an old sled from a previous saw. I may tinker with that and see if it is worthy. Most important is that I can wheel the thing easily around the cramped quarters and even out into the side yard. The large wheels on the mobile base take the door threshold and gravel drive in stride.
 
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Jim DeLaney

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I'm guessing the motor isn't original. All the old Craftsman saws I've seen used open frame motors - not TEFC. They were prone to get clogged with sawdust, too.
 

glenn bradley

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SoCal
I'm guessing the motor isn't original. All the old Craftsman saws I've seen used open frame motors - not TEFC. They were prone to get clogged with sawdust, too.
Correct. The old motor would have been cool to use but, the state of the wiring led me to use another. IIRC I got this motor for a song from a member here many years ago. I have an old 1HP motor that came with a 1970's Emerson saw I once owned. I will be swapping to it not so much because the 2HP is too much; it is just that the form factor is so large that I can't make miter cuts without the butt of the motor setting way over the table height :D
 
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