Grandfather Greene

Rennie Heuer

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Nailed it? Nah...I'm pretty sure he said he used screws. :rofl:
I don't know if Gustav, Charles and Henry would approve, but the crown is held together with three pocket hole screws at each corner. Then it is installed as a unit and screwed in from the back to a supporting structure with 5 screws. Someday, some less-than-bright person will move this by holding on to the crown. I want to make sure it survives. 😊 :crossed:
 

Vaughn McMillan

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I don't know if Gustav, Charles and Henry would approve, but the crown is held together with three pocket hole screws at each corner. Then it is installed as a unit and screwed in from the back to a supporting structure with 5 screws. Someday, some less-than-bright person will move this by holding on to the crown. I want to make sure it survives. 😊 :crossed:
Since screws seemed to be good enough for Sam Maloof, I doubt the Greenes would object too strongly. :thumb:
 
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Great job Rennie! I look forward to see it finished!

Each time I see one of those pieces, I tell myself that my next one will be made out of walnut. Then when I want to make it I always think that the design does not deserve it. I have to admit that I'm being influenced a lot by the price of american walnut here.

So either I design a fantastic piece worth of using it or I get rid of that frame of mind. :(
 

Rennie Heuer

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Exactly how I do my breadboard ends.

To clarify an earlier comment that seems to be taking a slight detour. I should have been more clear. My thoughts regarding the acceptance of my method had to do with the use of pocket hole screws in particular, not screws in general. Thanks Glenn for the 'nerd alert'. I have also seen x-ray photos of some of the Greene's chairs where the crest rail is held in place with some pretty serious screws and less than stellar examples of M&T joinery.

I guess it is all a moot point as pocket hole joinery has been around for well over 100 years, at least.
 

glenn bradley

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I guess it is all a moot point as pocket hole joinery has been around for well over 100 years, at least.
More nerd stuff:

"The concept of pocket jigs dates to the ancient Egyptians, but Joon Park, the former Hughes engineer, who has registered 19 patents since 1987, claimed that he had sole right to three pocket hole jig designs he had registered with the U.S. Patent Office beginning in 2003."
-- Business Record

Kreg and Mr. Park got into a bit of a fuss at one point.
 

Don Baer

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I think that Greene and Greene, Stickley, Morris and certainly Sam would all use what ever mean of fastening they deemed appropriate for the task as long as it did not detract from the piece and that would include pocket screws. I remember when I took the class with Maloof he was shaping an arm rest for a chair using a rasp. Someone asked him if he ever used a spoke shave and he went over to the tool cabinet and got one out. went back to the task and after taking a few swipes put it down and went back to the rasp and said it was too slow. Then he went on to say that there is no right or wrong tool use whatever one you are most comfortable. I think they would all say the same thing about fasteners.
 

Rennie Heuer

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I think that Greene and Greene, Stickley, Morris and certainly Sam would all use what ever mean of fastening they deemed appropriate for the task as long as it did not detract from the piece and that would include pocket screws. I remember when I took the class with Maloof he was shaping an arm rest for a chair using a rasp. Someone asked him if he ever used a spoke shave and he went over to the tool cabinet and got one out. went back to the task and after taking a few swipes put it down and went back to the rasp and said it was too slow. Then he went on to say that there is no right or wrong tool use whatever one you are most comfortable. I think they would all say the same thing about fasteners.
You are a wise fellow. A sage among us. (y) (y)
 
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Nails and screws are just a different kind of hardware if I may say so, we use them to fix hinges, door knobs, metal feet or casters, so, whay shouldn't they be used to fasten other parts of the furniture?
I do not know there in US, but here, the signature of a good cabinet maker (apart from his craftsmanship) was to aling the slots of the screw heads that could be seen in hinges or key escutcheons for instance. Unfortunately this attention to detail has been lost, first because of the implantation of Philips screws, and what is more sad, is that good cabinet makers are more and more scarce and even less apprentices.
 

Don Baer

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Nails and screws are just a different kind of hardware if I may say so, we use them to fix hinges, door knobs, metal feet or casters, so, whay shouldn't they be used to fasten other parts of the furniture?
I do not know there in US, but here, the signature of a good cabinet maker (apart from his craftsmanship) was to aling the slots of the screw heads that could be seen in hinges or key escutcheons for instance. Unfortunately this attention to detail has been lost, first because of the implantation of Philips screws, and what is more sad, is that good cabinet makers are more and more scarce and even less apprentices.
that's interesting, I noticed some time back while sitting on the throne that the screws holding the switch plate in the bathroom were all straight up and down so I looked over at the plug by the sink and sure enough they too were straight up and down so when I finished my business I went around the house and sure enough the screws on every cover plate in the house were straight up and down, I found it interesting that the electrician who wired this house took that much pride in his work to pay attention to those little details.
 

Rennie Heuer

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Finished up the last of the details today. Clock is disassembled again. Did the final hand sanding and inspection. Tomorrow’s job is to oil the inside so I can put it all back together.
You might have noticed I went with faux through tenons for the side rails. The legs are 7/8” thick and the rail mortises are 5/16” deep and the mortises for the faux tenon ends are 1/4” deep. I use 1 1/4” Kreg screws to draw the tenons in and 1/2” long “ends” to cover the screws. Because these are washer head screws there has to be someplace for the heads to go or you can’t fully seat the faux tenons. So, I mark the locations of the screws on the underside of the tenon and, using a 3/8” forstner bit, drill a pocket for them to sit in. Now I can drive the tenon all the way in and all the tenons will have the same exposure.
470F36E2-C672-4E95-823E-ED2682EC70D4.jpeg
 
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