How would you do this? Footstool - complete

Rennie Heuer

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I'm working on the design for a footstool for a client. He'd like me to match the legs of his antique chair - see pic. Only difference, the footstool leg will not be angled at the end as the chair is. I'm guessing there might be a combination of router bits that would get me there, but not sure which ones.

Foot close up.jpg
 
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glenn bradley

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I would look to some 'handrail' bits, architectural trim, or Crown molding bits. I didn't quickly find a perfect match but the links and search terms will give you the idea. If there are only 3 or 4 legs removing some bulk by some machine method and rasping will certainly get you there. Bits targeting box sides or box feet have some interesting shapes as well.
 

Bill Satko

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Methow Valley
I'd drill the concave with a Forstner bit, then shape the rest with chisels, rasps, and sandpaper.
I agree. Layout the profile on each face and using a bandsaw, backsaw and/or chisels, remove as much as the waste as you can and then finish the shaping with rasps and sandpaper. It is how you would shape a Cabriole leg. I suggest you look at Gramercy Tools. You will want some cabinetmaker rasps and maybe a rat tail. They will help you out if you are unsure what grain or size of rasp you need or give me a PM and I can let you know what I have used.

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Mike Stafford

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I did something similar a while back (a while back is Southern for a long time ago). In that instance I made crosscuts of the appropriate depth on the table saw with an extended fence and a stop to locate the cuts the same for every leg.
Then I used a chisel to split out the waste until I was close to my desired shape. I then pared it down with sharp chisels to the line. I didn't have the concave shape to deal with. If I did I would probably have used a die grinder with rasps to achieve the final shape.
 

Rennie Heuer

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Is it just the picture or is it me.. the picture of the original leg look slanted including the profile.. That may make things more difficult to match..
Nope, not you - it is slanted. This is the front leg on a Morris type chair. On the chair the legs cant back a few degrees making it necessary to match that angle on the foot pad so it will meet the floor square. Fortunately, the footstool I am building to match the chair has legs that are perpendicular to the floor so no angled foot pad needed.
 

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Rennie Heuer

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Thanks Charley!

This is the finished product. There are small differences in each of the feet - this was intentional, to a degree. The chair this stool will be paired with is over 100 years old and was hand made. There are variances in the carvings and the customer was rather specific - he wants the stool to look as though it was made at the same time as the chair.
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