Jig for keeping multiple boards flat during glue-up??

Matt Guyrd

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Northern Virginia
I'd be curious to know what type of jig you used, if any, to keep multiple boards flat when edge gluing. For instance, in making a cutting board, many strips are edge glued at once. How do you ensure that the faces remain flat to each other when clamping, particularly with longer glue-ups.

I've seen some use simple cauls, one on top and one on the bottom, clamped together. I've tried this, but had trouble fumbling with the clamps and cauls, all the while losing time as the glue sets (maybe using a glue other than yellow would help with the open time?).

I am thinking a modification to Ed Nelson's clamps here could be a place to start.

Any jigs, tips, or techniques? How do you do it?:huh:

Thanks!
Matt
 

tod evans

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ozarks
matt, clamps like the jlt have about a degree or so of camber built into the jaws that serves to force the clamped material down onto the bar of the clamp....when that fails i use deap reach vicegrips.....tod
 

Ed Nelson

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Charlotte, NC
Hey Matt,

You are welcome to use the jig I came up with. It worked well for what I needed. Another option is Woodcraft's clamping jig. I'm sure there are plenty of options. Mine was quick, easy, and best of all...cheap!:D Please show us what you come up with.
 

Aaron Beaver

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Kansas
Hey Matt,

You are welcome to use the jig I came up with. It worked well for what I needed. Another option is Woodcraft's clamping jig. I'm sure there are plenty of options. Mine was quick, easy, and best of all...cheap!:D Please show us what you come up with.
I have the one the Ed linked to, I bought them as a set from somewhere, got 2. It works pretty good, plus you can attach it to different size boads if your panel is wide or narrow. Its best to do a dry run with it so you know what knotch they slide into. If the panel is long is best to have 3 or 4 or them evenly spaced but the will put pressure on all four sides. Its a little work to get the ends to line up straight but if you cut your boards a touch long then that wouldn't be an issue.
 
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Vaughn McMillan

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ABQ NM
...I've seen some use simple cauls, one on top and one on the bottom, clamped together. I've tried this, but had trouble fumbling with the clamps and cauls, all the while losing time as the glue sets (maybe using a glue other than yellow would help with the open time?). ...
For cutting boards and such, I use simple cauls with c-clamps holding them together. (I also use wax paper to keep the cauls from becoming one with the cutting board.) I agree that you have to hurry a bit if using yellow glue, but I usually do a dry run first so I have everything adjusted to the correct size before I start. It also gets faster after you do a few of them and get the process refined. Also, I prefer to use plastic resin glue (i.e., DAP Weldwood) for a bit longer open times, and no creep problems in the finished product.
 

Matt Guyrd

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Location
Northern Virginia
Thanks, Fellas.

The more I think about this, the more I feel the need to find a good method. Deep-reach clamps...hmmm...this could be something to consider too...or even some of the quick-grips might help in my all-thumbs-fumbling routine.

One day I might own a jlt setup. :rofl: I was a bit sticker shocked at the few I saw when quick googling.:eek: But they look the cat's meow for gluing panels and doors!

I think modifying Ed's jig so that the bottom caul is height adjustable might be what I am after. Although the Woodcraft jig might be something to try and duplicate.

I guess my goal would be to develop an easy (quick) way to pull the bottom caul up tight to the bottom of the glue-up, which is already raised up on cauls.

Vaughan...thanks for the Dap idea...I could use the longer open time!

Matt
 

Steve Ash

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Michigan
I've seen some use simple cauls, one on top and one on the bottom, clamped together. I've tried this, but had trouble fumbling with the clamps and cauls, all the while losing time as the glue sets (maybe using a glue other than yellow would help with the open time?).
Same way I do it Matt, but on another thread ...http://familywoodworking.org/forums/showthread.php?t=1484 Craig Fuererzig (sp) had a picture showing this process that looked like a heck of a way to go....maybe he will see this thread and comment...or drop him a PM or look at his website. He makes a product called bowclamp, I'm thinking about getting some for my shop.
 
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Messages
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Location
Montclair, NJ
Thanks Steve

Thanks Steve,

I'd been watching this thread, but didn't want to be disrespectful of the advertizing rules or sound like a broken record :D

I think this is a perfect use of the curved caul method. If you have a rigid bench that won't flex, you can use them across the top, to keep the whole panel flat against the workbench...Or use 2 opposing...like )( to keep them flat, as they work like deep jaw clamps, but will give pressure along the whole length instead of just one spot.
 

Sean Wright

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WNY, Buffalo Area
I took 2 2x4s (slightly longer than the width of the panel that is to be glued up) and cut about 3/4in wide by 3/4in deep dado down the center of the 2in side. Then I took a piece of plastic sheeting and stapled it on the outside of both sides of the 2x4, with enough slack so that you can put the boards that you are joining into the dado, while clamping them. The plastic sheeting keeps the panel from gluing to the 2x4s. When clamped up, this will prevent panel from bowing under the clamping pressure.

One thing though, this assumes that you are using 3/4in stock. I tried using these same jigs for a panel that was planed to less than 3/4in thick and it didn't work so well.
 
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