Maybe a too long question to be answered here.

Messages
5,084
Location
Catalunya
Allright there it goes. When I had my elbow and shoulder injury which put my ww on hold for 2 years I started learning to play ukulele. Now I have an electric one with a katana 50 amplifyier. The problem is that I have no idea what kind of sounds are the ones depicted on the controls, such as Crunch, Lead, Brown, and how the Gain, Boost and others affect the sound. I have been trying different combinations, and watching some youtube videos, but I am still disoriented, so basically I am playing only with the Clean setting on.
one of the things I miss in thise videos is that they play different tunes and riffs with each setting so it makes difficult to me to understand the difference. I think that if the tune was the same all around the difference would be more obvious ( at least to me) Maybe Vaughn can or any other can PM me if it is too difficult to explain here.
thanks
 

Vaughn McMillan

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
33,333
Location
ABQ NM
The short answer is that the Clean setting (or Acoustic setting) will most likely be the best sound for ukulele. :thumb:

The Katana is a great amp because it can copy the sound of lot of different amps. The other settings like Crunch, Brown, and Lead are more suitable for electric guitar though, especially for playing blues and rock music. They add varying degrees of distortion (fizziness). The Gain and Boost knobs (or switches) also add distortion to the sound. In the next day or two I'll try to record a sample of what each one sounds like while playing the same tune for each.
 
Messages
5,084
Location
Catalunya
Thanks Vaughn.
The amp has also a setting for acoustic guitars or ukes. Maybe I didn’t explain myself well, the uke I have is a true electric one, with 2 humbuckers, tone and volume knobs and a commuter switch to connect one or the other of the humbuckers or both at same time. Here you have it. I also have an acoustic one, that I cannot plug into the amp. I want to buy an electroacoustic one, but I am refrainig from it as I am not good enough yet. The electric one was an unexpected present I got when I started learning to play it.
CB039D67-A604-485D-8828-D0DCDA6B879E.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Vaughn McMillan

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
33,333
Location
ABQ NM
Ah, that's a bit different story, Toni. I didn't realize that electric ukes like that existed. It looks like it could be a lot of fun. :thumb:

There are no firm rules when playing an electric instrument through an amp, but in general, the more distorted the tone, the better it sounds if you limit your chords to simple voicings. (By that, I mean strumming only two strings or three instead of all four.) Before I go too much further, can you tell me what chords you know how to play? Major chords, minor chords, 7th chords, etc.?
 

Darren Wright

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
17,447
Location
Kansas City, Missouri
Thanks Vaughn.
The amp has also a setting for acoustic guitars or ukes. Maybe I didn’t explain myself well, the uke I have is a true electric one, with 2 humbuckers, tone and volume knobs and a commuter switch to connect one or the other of the humbuckers or both at same time. Here you have it. I also have an acoustic one, that I cannot plug into the amp. I want to buy an electroacoustic one, but I am refrainig from it as I am not good enough yet. The electric one was an unexpected present I got when I started learning to play it.
View attachment 110391
I can see Mr. Dowell wanting one of these, cool looking Uke!
 
Messages
5,084
Location
Catalunya
Hi Vaughn, to answer your question, so far I know the most common major and minor chords, and some 7th chords. I do not know diminished or sus ones.
My main problem like all beginners is more a coordination problem than anything. Getting used to have my right hand strumming a pattern and my left one changing chords when it is due is my nightmare, not to talk when on top of that I want to sing.
To be honest I do prefer fingerpicking songs because it is easier for me to recognize the melody rather than playing the harmony, which disorients me.
Like any beginner, bar chords are also difficult for me.
 

Brent Dowell

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
15,273
Location
Reno NV
I've got an electric mandola, which is like a mandolin, but a little bitter, and tuned a little lower.

I've also got an acoustic/electric uke.

I'll admit I'm not much of a tone master. I've got a Marshall code 100 amp and a little fender mustang. They both have a number of presets and I usually just take one of the presets I like and I might adjust some of the parameters a little bit. They both hook up to the computer so I can edit my presets that way.

It's definitely an art.



mandola.jpguke.jpg
 

Vaughn McMillan

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
33,333
Location
ABQ NM
Toni, it sounds like you have a good assortment of chords to work with, but I think overall you'll get the most use out of the Clean or Acoustic settings for your amp. I'll try to record some examples for you to show how the more distorted settings would typically be used, but for strumming or fingerpicking, I think the undistorted settings will sound better.

That said, there's no harm in experimenting around with the different options on the amp to see if there's anything hidden in there that you like.
 
Messages
5,084
Location
Catalunya
Hi Vaughn, here you have link to the sound and song I want play. According to the guy who plays it he is using overdrive ( don't know what that is) although he says that the original song was played clean.
It is a song from a catalan group from the sixties called Los Relámpagos.
 

Vaughn McMillan

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
33,333
Location
ABQ NM
Toni, the "overdrive" he's using simply adds distortion to the sound.

To get something like that tone, I'd start with your ukulele set on the bridge pickup only. Then set your amp on the Crunch or Lead setting. As you turn up the Gain knob, you'll be adding overdrive. It also sounds like he's got the Treble knob turned up pretty high (maybe start at about 3 o'clock), and the Bass knob somewhere below the halfway point. (You'll have to experiment with each of these knobs to see if they get you any closer to the tone you want.)

Also, it looks like you can add overdrive or boost (which is similar to overdrive) with the Effects buttons and knobs on your amp. Based on this chart, if you push the Booster/Mod button until it turns red, and turn the Booster/Mod knob anywhere from the Off position the the 12 o'clock position you will be adding overdrive. (If you are in Bank A.) Doing the same in Bank B will give you the Mid Boost effect. Also experiment with the Blues Drive, Clean Boost, and Treble Boost to see how they change the tone of your ukulele.

Katana Booster Mod Settings.jpg

To switch between Bank A and Bank B, hold down the Panel button for about 1 second:

Katana Bank Selection.jpg
You may find it's easier to make and save all of these adjustments by connecting the amp to your computer and using the Katana software:

Katana Software Details.jpg

Like pretty much anything related to audio electronics, you'll need to experiment with each of these options to see how they change the sound. Some may make it sound bad, some will make it sound good. It's all very subjective. But you won't harm anything by experimenting. Let me know if this helps, or if it just adds to the confusion. ;)
 
Top