My daughter found this hidden in laundry room

allen levine

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Guessing a previous home owner hid it and forgot about it
Not the previous owner
Any value or just a rusted out wall hanger?
My daughter has been in house over a year
 

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What I'd need to see is the barrel separately. The stock is very early percussion, possibly made for a flintlock. I have 2 of these shotguns. There both 1830's
Mike do a rubbing of the engravings.
 
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Dan Noren

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how old is her house? this little beauty could go back as far as 1850. could be a 9 gauge. not that odd, as some single barrel shotguns could be 4 or 6 gauge at the time.
 

Vaughn McMillan

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That's quite a find! I agree with Darren...I'd have a good gunsmith have a look at it. I doubt you'd want to shoot it, but it looks like a great addition to a collection. (Even if you're not a collector.)
 

Mike Stafford

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Having watched many episodes of Antiques Roadshow, I am unequivocally qualified to evaluate your find and I declare I have no idea what it is worth or whether is worth anything.:p At first sight I thought it was just an old shot gun but it is definitely a percussion weapon (I think). That makes it pretty darn old.

Take a look at this Google link to L.T. Moore shot guns. https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=ALeKk02MISstVa0_b6FeeT9WKZWw55JK5g:1592216592270&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=L.+T.+Moore+shotguns+London&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiGz4yDzYPqAhXAQjABHXlmBOoQsAR6BAgFEAE&biw=1536&bih=722

I have an old double barrel 12 gauge that was built in the 1870's but your gun is definitely older. Can't wait to learn what you find out about it.
 

Don Baer

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I have an 1962 Tower (the company later became Enfield) .58 cal that I have owned for over 50 years. It has been valued at for about $3000- $5000. It is in firing condition. Yours on the other hand I did notice the hammer appears to have a chip in it so that may hurt the value. Like Darren said it might be W Moore. Does the name appear like this..
1592231904285.png
Like others have said take it to a dealer.
 

Dan Noren

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looks like an entirely different lock set up from that one. the engraving on the lock and hammer is more detailed. could be a real oldie...
can you get better close ups of the sides of the barrels?
There was also a William Moore and Co. of London, England that produced shotguns in the period 1853-1895, however, his shotguns will be marked 43 Old Bond Street, London on the top barrel rib and are manufactured to a higher quality and ornamentation than the Pieper trade guns.
 
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Charles Lent

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Putting a stick down each barrel, marking where it stops on the stick, and then placing the stick outside the barrel to see where the blockage is, is a sure way to see if it's still loaded. If unloaded, the stick end will go slightly past the bottom of the percussion firing hole. If it stops before that, there is something, likely a charge, still in the barrel. Considerable air pressure down the percussion firing hole may dislodge it. If not, I would have a gunsmith clear it for you. DON'T try to dig it out.

That would look real nice if cleaned up, even if it was never rebuilt to fire again. Collectors would want it in the present condition, so it can be "restored properly". They want the original patina, etc. that those of us wouldn't appreciate if we cleaned it up, and doing it improperly would destroy it's value to them. Have someone with experience in antique arms look it over, and put a value on it, before you decide to do anything with it.

I have a single shot derringer of about the same age (percussion cap type). One of my ancestors on my father's side once owned it, but I was never told who. It only has a 3 digit serial number, and no other markings. It had a broken hammer spring when it was given to me. A toolmaker friend made a replacement for me, but I have the original broken spring as well. It isn't restored, just oiled and kept in a safe place. I show it off occasionally, when asked about it.


Charley
 

allen levine

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new york city burbs
Putting a stick down each barrel, marking where it stops on the stick, and then placing the stick outside the barrel to see where the blockage is, is a sure way to see if it's still loaded. If unloaded, the stick end will go slightly past the bottom of the percussion firing hole. If it stops before that, there is something, likely a charge, still in the barrel. Considerable air pressure down the percussion firing hole may dislodge it. If not, I would have a gunsmith clear it for you. DON'T try to dig it out.

That would look real nice if cleaned up, even if it was never rebuilt to fire again. Collectors would want it in the present condition, so it can be "restored properly". They want the original patina, etc. that those of us wouldn't appreciate if we cleaned it up, and doing it improperly would destroy it's value to them. Have someone with experience in antique arms look it over, and put a value on it, before you decide to do anything with it.

I have a single shot derringer of about the same age (percussion cap type). One of my ancestors on my father's side once owned it, but I was never told who. It only has a 3 digit serial number, and no other markings. It had a broken hammer spring when it was given to me. A toolmaker friend made a replacement for me, but I have the original broken spring as well. It isn't restored, just oiled and kept in a safe place. I show it off occasionally, when asked about it.


Charley

this gun was put away, hidden, I cant imagine anyone would have loaded it and put it up there. The previous owner was there for 30 years, and they never found it. He isnt handling it anymore, I will check it when I get to their house. I dont think he will sell it, it will always be a good conversation piece for him. Ive been begging him and my son to get licenses so I could pass along the few handguns I have , long guns dont need licenses here, but Id hold on to my shotgun, ruger 10/22, camp 9, marlin lever 22, just because they are fun to shoot, shotgun for personal protection.
 
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