New Shop Journey

glenn bradley

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SoCal
I'm almost sort of shell-shocked and spent most of yesterday just planning (or maybe stalling). I have had so much time to plan that now that I am actually here I was momentarily confused . . . OK, OK, . . . I can hear you thinking it . . . I'm confused all the time :).

My friend who has done all the CAD work and been my primary sounding board through the last year was going to be my partner in this effort. A family situation has him out of pocket although he will parachute in now and again to assist. I feel for him because, like me, he is a guy who is happiest when he is busy. Like me he has been bored stiff and waiting for this moment; he has been looking forward to this work. He is now in the situation where he has helped design the thing, helped build the BOM, order parts, plan and re-plan things to the 'nth' degree, and now has to watch from the sidelines for much of the fun part.

I'll start schlepping tools and supplies out there today.
 

glenn bradley

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SoCal
Thanks Guys. I shook it off :). This whole project will be a series of steps, all enjoyable. First steps, sweep up after the contractors, vacuum the control-joint cuts in the slab and seal the cuts and the slab to bottom plate joints. If I get that done I will feel pretty good (there's a lot of lineal feet of caulking to do). If I get some of the electrical supplies moved into the space; bonus.

And so the next phase begins:
New Shop (96).jpg
 

glenn bradley

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10,103
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SoCal
A Quick Thanks!

Someone asked about having your control joints sawed instead of troweled. This is only one of many things I will be doing during this shop build that are a direct result of listening and sharing with others. I want to send out a think you to all those people who gave me ideas and contributed to my decisions often without realizing they had.

Although I get a lot of direct input from reading the threads, PM's and so forth, there is a large amount of info out there that is "between the lines". I think it is safe to say that I have picked up things as much from seeing something in the background of a picture or reading something mentioned in passing during the primary discussion as I have from the topic at hand.

I started to name names but soon realized it was futile. Rennie, Larry, Vaughn, Bill, Darren, Brent, Tom, Don . . . see what I mean? So, thanks to all who have contributed to my 'knowledge base', directly or indirectly, purposefully or without realizing it, it doesn't matter. Thank you ;)
 

Ryan Mooney

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That floor does look quite nicely done! Are you planning to top coat it or put anything over the concrete?

added the second service panel

Ok so +1 on having a secondary panel but (as usual :D) I have some questions:

  • Why right next to the existing? I can see arguments for having it there (easy, less large wire, etc..), and other arguments for putting it further away (possibly easier to run future runs from the sub panel if it's closer to where the new thing will live).
  • What are you putting in the subpanel vs the main? I'm assuming there's already a plan for what naturally belongs on either (and that may well answer some of my first question).
 

glenn bradley

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10,103
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SoCal
That floor does look quite nicely done! Are you planning to top coat it or put anything over the concrete?



Ok so +1 on having a secondary panel but (as usual :D) I have some questions:

  • Why right next to the existing? I can see arguments for having it there (easy, less large wire, etc..), and other arguments for putting it further away (possibly easier to run future runs from the sub panel if it's closer to where the new thing will live).
  • What are you putting in the subpanel vs the main? I'm assuming there's already a plan for what naturally belongs on either (and that may well answer some of my first question).
I'm going with just concrete. My habit is to use rubber mats in locations where I stay still for periods of time.

To the service panels . . . It is a matter of capacity; I just needed more slots. It is true that if the second panel were located on say, an opposite wall, it could give you some versatility. With my plan the second panel is mostly 120v general and dedicated use wall outlets.

The first panel is 240v service and lighting. These panels will also serve fan and lights or a covered patio area outside. Other tasks will include security devices, computers, and music systems for shop and yard.
 

Bill Arnold

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... To the service panels . . . It is a matter of capacity; I just needed more slots. It is true that if the second panel were located on say, an opposite wall, it could give you some versatility. With my plan the second panel is mostly 120v general and dedicated use wall outlets.

The first panel is 240v service and lighting. These panels will also serve fan and lights or a covered patio area outside. Other tasks will include security devices, computers, and music systems for shop and yard.
One thing to consider (which you might have) is to put all lighting on one panel and all tools on another. I wish I had done my shop that way, so a flip of the main breaker in the "tools" box kills everything.
 

glenn bradley

Member
Messages
10,103
Location
SoCal
Actually drilled those in place. Top plate too.
New Shop (104).jpg
I did however use a cardboard template and an awl to mark the holes :p.

Many more holes drilled around the perimeter today but, not in formation :D. Still some left for tomorrow. How can it take so long? Well . . .
- Hit nails. Went to the BORG for a nail eating drill bit.
- Split some blocking due to hitting nails. Had to replace.
- Got tired and took a nap :sleep::sleep::sleep:
- Many trips up and down the ladder.

It doesn't sound like much but I feel like I did something today. It's all part of the fun.
 
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