Plastic nail gun nails

Leo Voisine

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Uhhh yeah I know!!!

Weird

I have seen these plastic nails used on CNC machine in youtube vids.

I am making a fixture and I want to fix some pressed hardboard (masonite) to the MDF fixture base.

Regular metal brad nails are soft and easily cut, but with feeds and speeds on a CNC router and the nature of carbide the cutter can get chipped.

The plastic nails do not damage the cutter

I have 3 Porter nail guns. I don't need plastic framing nails - so - either brad of finish nails

Any thoughts as to where to find the plastic nails?
 

Ryan Mooney

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Spotnails and raptor seem to be two brands with some..



Also raptor composite nails (probably sold various places as well..)

The warning at the bottom of the page.. probably applies to most (or at least that seems.. reasonable):

COMPATIBILITY WARNING FOR COMPOSITE PLASTIC STAPLES AND NAILS
Due to operating pressures and other factors, plastic Raptor nails and staples must be used with tools designed specifically for them.
 

Ryan Mooney

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I have seen some of those, but I believe the problem is going to compatability with my Porter Cable gun.

yeah that seemed to be the main challenge :)

An alternative thought might be some sort of wooden trenail ?

I could plausibly see using something like wooden caning pegs or something similar into a matching reamed tapered hole.. With a matching taper they would lock quite tightly (akin to how a morse taper locks).. You'd have to figure out the matching taper but that seems plausibly doable https://go.rockler.com/tech/41335.pdf

Or.. if you used something like these stepped dowels https://www.rockler.com/1x-miller-oak-dowels-40-pack with the corresponding stepped drill bit you could pre-split the end of the dowl and fox wedge it into the hole quite quickly.

You might also be able to use square dowels into round holes (https://www.amazon.com/60-Pack-12-Square-Wood-Dowel/dp/B09TKSP9HR/) basically drill the holes at the minor diameter (or possibly a smidge over depending on the material) and the square edges of the dowel will bit in quite well akin to a square nail when driven in. I've used this method with some success with just some hand riven oak dowels.
 

Ryan Mooney

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I think I'd try the square dowels for that and see how they work for you. Cheap, fast. easy...

MDF actually takes a thread pretty well

A little CA in the hole, wait 5m and run the tap through again also helps..

The infinity tools wood taps have a slightly different cutter profile that I've found works a smidge better than metal taps as well..


Plastic socket head screws aren't super expensive.. nice idea.
 
Thank you Ryan,

I have seen some of those, but I believe the problem is going to compatability with my Porter Cable gun.

I don't have enough need to warrent buying the gun.
I have used them in a Porter Cable gun and a Senco. I cant remember what brand or where I got them tho. But I do remember you need to be sure and ware safety glasses when using them
 

Brent Dowell

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MDF actually takes a thread pretty well. Could consider some nylon bolts from below into holes threaded on the spoil board?
That's what I did on my ox. I used the nylon bolts to hold some 'positioning' jigs, and then 3d printed hold downs to hold the work piece in place.

I used the cnc to drill the holes, then just chucked a 1/4x20 tap in a drill and ran all the threads real quick. I then put a little super glue on each hole to give the threaded mdf a little more durability.

The 3d printed plastic hold downs were sacrificial, and I have to admit I did run through them a few times, lol.
 
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