Tod's Top Tip!

Messages
161
Location
Stockport, England
The simplest ideas are often the best, and they don't come much simpler than Tod's method of putting a straight edge on a rough board which he outlined on another thread the other day.

For those who missed it I have explained it in more detail here. I had 15 boards of oak to 'straightline' yesterday and what would have taken me a couple of hours was done in 30 minutes.

Take an 8' length of MDF 6" wide and attach a cleat along one edge and across one end

Guide.jpg


Then set the rough board on the table saw with any bow curving away from the fence in the middle

BowedBoard.jpg


Place the jig over the board with the long cleat towards the fence and the short cleat towards yourself

Guidwinplace.jpg


Measure the shortest width of jig and board - this will be at one end

Tape.jpg


Set the fence to the same measurement

Setting.jpg


Rip away!

Ripping.jpg


The newly sawn edge will be perfectly straight

StraightEdge.jpg


Flip the board over, trim the other edge, et voila!
A stack of perfectly straightedged boards

Stackofboards.jpg


I realise that I risk ridicule by revealing that I am the only person here not already to straightline their boards in this way, but I am so bowled over by the simplicity and accuracy of Tod's jig - I just have to share it!

Thanks again, Tod.
 
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tod evans

Member
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4,993
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ozarks
you`re welcome duncan! and thanks for taking the time to document "how-to" .........i really do type one fingered so it`s a wonder that i can convey anything using print:eek:
 

Jeff Horton

Member
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4,272
Location
The Heart of Dixie
I realise that I risk ridicule by revealing that I am the only person here not already to straightline their boards in this way, but I am so bowled over by the simplicity and accuracy of Tod's jig - I just have to share it!

No, your not the only one! I had seen that post but didn't think much about it. Obviously I didn't grasp how simple and effective Todd's idea was! This is going on my list of things to build.
 

glenn bradley

Member
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10,416
Location
SoCal
Great series of pics. Thanks to both of you. Forum team work strikes again. I have a long piece of MDF that I use as a guide but the addition of the cleats and resting the jig on top of the material to be straightened rocks.
 
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Jim O'Dell

Member
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2,784
Location
Between Aledo and Fort Worth, TX
I understood the concept, but seeing the picture documented tutorial really helps solidify the process. So I thank both of you, too! So far, I haven't used much bowed wood, not any rough wood at all. but that will change as I just about have the shop to the point that I can actually attempt to build something! Jim.
 

Bruce Page

Member
Messages
1,099
Location
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Thanks Duncan, Tod
I’ve been using a straight piece of MDF & those little aluminum clamps to straight line rip. It worked but you always had to go back and skim cut the edge square. Tod’s jig sets the board to be ripped flat on the table. How cool it that! :thumb:
 

Don Taylor

Former Member (by the member's request)
Messages
1,289
Thank you Tod, Thank you Duncan. :thumb:

I just happen to have two thin 8 foot and two 4 foot pieces of MDF I trimmed off my work table upgrade and I wondered what I would end up doing with them.

This is another great case of the Family working together. :clap:

I would imagine that if the combined "Tips, Tricks and Jigs" knowledge available from our members were to be compiled into a tome, the sales would be phenomenal!

How bout that for a forum financing endeavor? :huh:

:biker: :biker: :biker: :biker: :biker:

DT
 

Michael Short

Member
Messages
2
Thanks for taking the time to post the pictures and instructional. Very helpful information to us newbies to woodworking.

I have learned alot already from the forums and think it is great that so many take the time to share the info. Thanks to both Tod and Duncan for a GREAT tip.
 

Greg Jones

Member
Messages
9
Looks like an excellent idea, however I have a question. I understand that the long cleat keeps the board from moving towards the fence, but what keeps the board from drifting away from the long cleat? It would appear that the board could pull away from the long cleat as the grain tries to track with the blade. Is this not an issue with this jig?
 

Greg Jones

Member
Messages
9
Well, that's as simple as the jig itself! I was thinking it would be fed by pushing the jig, as one would do with one of the clamped jigs. Thanks!
 

Frank Pellow

Member
Messages
2,332
Location
Toronto, Ontario, CANADA
Thanks for the tip Tod and thanks for the great illustrated tutorial Duncan.

It appears to me that this might eliminate a need for a jointer. What do you say to that Tod and Duncan?

aside to a moderator: This thread should be moved to the JIgs and Fixtures forum.

[edit] i moved it frank, thanks!
 
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Messages
161
Location
Stockport, England
frank, i don`t own or use a jointer..

I have a jointer but don't use it a whole lot.

I would be more likely to dress up the edges of boards or componants by running them through my thickness planer on edge in batches of 3 or 4. I get a better finish that way and I'm controlling the width of the board at the same time.

For jointing boards together I find the table saw gives a perfectly good line - I tend to mess it up if I then put it over the jointer!
 
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