What kind of wood is this?

Dale Wallace

Member
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34
Location
Chicago, Illinois
That would be my guess (emphasis on the 'guess')
i would say its ash
It's either Ash, or Red Oak. I'm leaning more toward the Oak.
So actually I made 2 serving trays and some end grain coasters with it even though I realized later on it could had been a bad idea. But I can always keep them for samples. Do you think that it would be too risky to use them for serving? Not cutting on them, I can give them as gifts to some friends so I can definitely give them instructions on how to use them, that means no liquids or cutting on them. What do you think?
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Dale Wallace

Member
Messages
34
Location
Chicago, Illinois
Whatever it is, it's nice-looking wood. :thumb: Why do you think it might be risky to use it for serviong?
In terms of bacteria, due to the open grain, especially after a lot of use if liquids start getting absorbed in the wood. Maybe I'm wrong, what do you think? Everyone in here has more experience than me so I appreciate your advices guys.

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larry merlau

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18,205
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Delton, Michigan
when you worked it.did it have any unpleasent odor? generally for cutting boards they use food grade oil i think i dont make cutting boards. for serving try anything is fine. i read somewhere that other finishes are ok after they have dried a certain amount of time but i relying on memory thes guys making cutting boards are the ones to listen to
 

Dale Wallace

Member
Messages
34
Location
Chicago, Illinois
when you worked it.did it have any unpleasent odor? generally for cutting boards they use food grade oil i think i dont make cutting boards. for serving try anything is fine. i read somewhere that other finishes are ok after they have dried a certain amount of time but i relying on memory thes guys making cutting boards are the ones to listen to
Not an unpleasant odor but I think a normal wood smell, I used Walrus oil which is food safe, made out of mineral oil, coconut oil, beeswax and vitamin E and then I applied my own beeswax. Right now if you bring it really close to your face you can smell the wood but with the combination of the wax and oil I'd say it has a very pleasant smell. This is what 2 other friends told me as well.

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larry merlau

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18,205
Location
Delton, Michigan
reason i asked was elm when working it can have a unpleasent odor and oak can be very robust as well.. the end grain of that wood you have doesnt look like oak to tight.. so i would say your good to go and make bunches and sell on ebay:)
 

Vaughn McMillan

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Staff member
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32,539
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ABQ NM
In terms of bacteria, due to the open grain, especially after a lot of use if liquids start getting absorbed in the wood. Maybe I'm wrong, what do you think? Everyone in here has more experience than me so I appreciate your advices guys.

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I've read a lot of articles about wood vs. plastic cutting boards. I think these days the general consensus is that wood is more likely to stay sanitary. Of course a tight-grained wood is better than one with more open pores, but I think you're fine if the cutting board is cleaned with hot soapy water and kept oiled with mineral oil. Here's some more reading if you're interested:

 

Dale Wallace

Member
Messages
34
Location
Chicago, Illinois
I've read a lot of articles about wood vs. plastic cutting boards. I think these days the general consensus is that wood is more likely to stay sanitary. Of course a tight-grained wood is better than one with more open pores, but I think you're fine if the cutting board is cleaned with hot soapy water and kept oiled with mineral oil. Here's some more reading if you're interested:

Thank you for the information, very helpful!
Btw I happen to have read these articles lol

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Mike Stafford

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706
Location
Coastal plain of North Carolina
It is interesting reading the article from N.C. State. That argument has gone on for many years. I studied Food Science and Food Engineering at NCSU and worked in the food industry for many years on food safety and inspection. Most, if not all, regulatory agencies will not allow the use of wooden cutting boards. The thought is that wood is porous and holds the bacteria. But the scratches on a plastic, most cutting boards these days are made from high density polyethylene, are impossible to clean and are not self healing. Both varieties can be resurfaced with a planer to obtain a new surface but you seldom encounter anyone doing so. They just throw them out.

At home I prefer the thin hard plastic mats. They seem to last a long time and don't cost a fortune. You can get them color coded with colors for meat, poultry, vegetables and seafood. I like using them because you pick them up and sort of fold them to empty the diced/sliced material into a pan for cooking or into a storage container.
 
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