Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Advice sought re: LV Mk II power sharpening system

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Posts
    31

    Advice sought re: LV Mk II power sharpening system

    I have been using "scary-sharp", and have been generally satisfied with the results. I use the LV Mk II sharpening jig/fixture as well as free hand. However, I'm looking to speed up the process. I've also found that long sessions can aggravate carpal tunnel issues.

    I've used water stones in the past, but my current workspace doesn't have easy access to a water supply or drainage. The water issue keeps me from considering using stones or the Tormek/Jet offerings.

    I'm curious if anyone here has used the LV Mk II power sharpening system or has any thoughts about it. I do realize the increased cost of consumables, but for the volume of work that I do it's not a problem. Ease of use and speed are the key issues. The review in the FWW 2007 Tools edition is very positive. Any first-hand insights or advice will be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Steve Clardy Guest
    I've had mine for over a year now.
    Makes quick work of sharpening planes irons, chisels, and my pocket knife [free hand sharpening]

    I couldn't quite hack that elcheapo inline on/off switch with a 3' cord, so I mounted a rockler router switch on the side of the unit with a long cord.
    Very happy with mine. I'm still using the original 4 grits that came with the unit.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Forest Grove, Oregon USA
    Posts
    290
    Hi John,

    Motorized Scary Sharp. Other than being motorized, it is similar to what you do now which I think would be a plus as far as change in a sharpening routine goes.

    There are two commercial "names" in so far as these machines go. The other is LapSharp. I had both these machines in-house for an article I was writing and both are similar, both get the job done. Of the two, and costing a lot more, the LapSharp is clearly the better machine. It is extremely well made. It also turns at a lower rpm which is actually a positive thing. One can use water with it.

    That probably sounds negative concerning the LV unit--But I don't intend it to be. The LV MK.II Power Sharpener is a good machine at an affordable price. The LS has both a higher initial cost and the jigs are fairly costly as well. From a cost/performance standpoint, the LV unit is above the LS.

    You can get better discs in a wider range of grits from Joel at Tools for Working Wood. Email him for recommendations. I also think you'll find that after the initial purchase of the discs and getting use to applying them, removing them, etc, the consumable portion of the cost isn't that high.

    Oh, get an extra platter or two from LV as well. You would do well to have one or two extra of the thick ones and one more of the thin ones. Depending on the grit jumps you intend on. That way you can avoid having to remove discs prematurely in order to swap discs.

    If you go for the LV unit, consider installing a foot operated power switch. Having both hands available when using the machine is a plus. I believe LV also has some good options there.

    Take care, Mike
    Wenzloff & Sons Sawmakers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Posts
    31
    Thanks for all the info, guys. Just a few more questions. Is it worth the extra discs/steps of working through the grits, or are the basic choices (that come with machine) adequate? How long does it take at each grit? Finally, with regard to using honing compound, is it worth getting the LV felt wheel or is it better to use a 3mm disc and apply a piece of cloth as some have suggested?

    I'm pretty convinced to simply order one and give it a try. I just want to fine tune my order.

    Thanks!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Forest Grove, Oregon USA
    Posts
    290
    Hi John,

    I guess it always comes down to how refined we each consider good enough. For instance, I would probably always finish by hand anyway, as well while working I would always choose to renew an edge by hand. Just faster at that point.

    Skipping grits in big jumps means longer on each finer disc. 320 to 1200 is a large jump. Also, it requires one to remove and swap the discs. So I still recommend getting the extra platters. The thin 3 mm is only useful for the finiest grit, so an extra thick 4 mm platter should be purchased for any other grits you get.

    The reason is each disc will last longer if it is mounted on its own platter..

    Take care, Mike
    Wenzloff & Sons Sawmakers

  6. #6
    Steve Clardy Guest
    I'm happy with the four discs that came with mine.
    I did get an extra set along with the machine

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Smithville, TX
    Posts
    358
    I've had my LV MK for a little over two years, I believe. Very happy with it for all my flat tools. Quick, nearly brainless, repeatable, discs last a long time. I have played with the LS at a friends shop and was very impressed, as well. For my turning tools -- it's the Wolverine system and my grinder. I care more about speed and getting back to work than I do about how pretty an edge I get. I think both of my systems reflect this. They do a great job, but there are definitely superior systems out there for sharpening afficienados (sp?).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,470
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Blasco View Post
    For my turning tools -- it's the Wolverine system and my grinder. I care more about speed and getting back to work than I do about how pretty an edge I get. I think both of my systems reflect this. They do a great job, but there are definitely superior systems out there for sharpening afficienados (sp?).
    So Sam,
    Lets see some of your turnings...
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Laguna Beach, California
    Posts
    20
    I have the LV mark 11. It is good and easy to get very good results.On finer tools I use Shapton stones for the backs. A good machine... I still like to use shapton stones for chisel backs and plane irons. It is too easy to ruin them using the Mark II. So I feel it is a quick way to get a good edge on most tools.
    Last edited by Mark Singer; 11-15-2006 at 05:57 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. Tormek sharpening system
    By Toni Ciuraneta in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 08-03-2015, 11:16 PM
  2. Sharpening System Comparison
    By Ken Easley in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 03-27-2015, 08:23 PM
  3. Great sharpening system
    By Rich Soby in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-20-2011, 01:42 AM
  4. Flatwork help and advice sought
    By Rob Keeble in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 04-25-2010, 02:43 PM
  5. band saw blade advice sought
    By ken werner in forum New Tools
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 05-05-2007, 01:39 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •