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Thread: Bastille Chair Designed By Piet Blom

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    Bastille Chair Designed By Piet Blom


    Constructivist chair--an homage to De Stijl--by noted Dutch architect Piet Blom (1934-99). Made by Huizenga for the cafeteria of the Faculty Club (nicknamed The Bastille) at the University of Twente, a 1968 Blom project. Of an edition of 400 or so, fewer than 200 survived a renovation. Only a handful retain their original paint. You can buy an original one for $4250. I wonder how many you could make for that price.


    This looks like a fun chair to build. Maybe a good use for that Festool domino you've got sitting in your shop.

    It's nice to share these old pieces of furniture I find here. The members on several other woodworking forums I look at just don't seem to get it. If it isn't Arts and Crafts or Shaker they aren't interested. A pretty narrow view in my estimation.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

  2. #2
    is not that practical. not much place to put your feet

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    Your feet aren't supposed to be under the chair. Practicality wasn't the point of posting this.
    Last edited by Dave Richards; 05-15-2014 at 07:51 PM.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

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    would be a nice project to make out of left over 2x4s and plywood shorts.
    Human Test Dummy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Richards View Post
    Maybe a good use for that Festool domino you've got sitting in your shop
    Looked at, haven't been able to justify it. Still cut everything pretty much by hand (although my J/P has a horizontal mortiser attachment I don't use it much because of the setup/teardown time if you're only cutting 4-5 its faster just to use a chisel and besides the practice is good )

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Richards View Post
    It's nice to share these old pieces of furniture I find here. The members on several other woodworking forums I look at just don't seem to get it. If it isn't Arts and Crafts or Shaker they aren't interested. A pretty narrow view in my estimation.
    And thanks for sharing them! A lot of times I don't like specific elements of a design or find some of the more artsy things impractical but they are always interesting as brain food.

    Often I think its interesting to re-consider the pieces in different contexts, at least as a thought exercise. There are a few variations on this chair I think it would be interesting to look at if one had time. I like the back and frame work, the boxy front not as much

  6. #6
    I think, a lot of times, it's a materials and construction issue.

    I mean, as a woodworker, what practical interest do I have in these designs, other than gross form?







    All these chairs are beautiful, famous, acclaimed designs as pieces of Modern Art or Industrial Design. But there's no way I can reproduce any of them or anything like them without completely reworking my shop and skills.

    As woodworkers, I think we can look backwards and admire the skill required to do intricate carving, cabriole legs, inlays, veneering, and all the things the old guys used to do. But we can't look forwards at a CNC-cut, bent, 27-ply custom laminated plywood chair and feel the same way.



    Sure, it's pretty cool, but it doesn't really have a bearing on my life or skills.

    That being said, I always love me a good Sketchup and what's more Modern than something beautiful that only exists on a computer???

    Thanks Dave!

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    theres a show in Manhattan NY at the Jacob javits this weekend, not open to the public, its all the new designs in furniture, I saw some pics in the local paper this morning, a show Id love to go too.
    only problem is the show is only open to public next Tuesday, and that's a really bad day for me.(My wife is going in for some testing in hospital and I want to be with her)

    saw a picture of something similar to that laminated plywood chair, I think the price was over 4000.00
    Human Test Dummy

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    Interesting design my first thoughts were not something i would share here. Then i got to think about it, and if those were in use at a bar by a lady with a cute pair of legs she would be able to hide them behind the two flat pieces. Thats about all i can find great in them.

    They very upright, heck even the Amish furniture store i visited a while back had high chairs for raised tables that had great curved backs. By curved i mean so you can tilt you spine from 90* rather than be sitting upright.

    Definitely could not see myself buying these even if they were on sale at Ikea. lol Sorry Dave this one just does not do it for me i would expect more from highschool woodshop kids. And i sit at my desk on an non-padded solid wood chair. Comfy if the chair is reasonably designed. Perhaps he was on a jobsite when he came up with these.

    Anyhow thanks for sharing them i like the variety of what you share gets us all thinking about design as a aspect to what makes good woodworking furniture in my opinion.
    cheers

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    Of course I don't expect them to be everyone's cup of tea.

    Here is a photo of a room with a number of these chairs.
    Irony: The opposite of Wrinkly

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Richards View Post
    Of course I don't expect them to be everyone's cup of tea.
    Even better when they aren't. If we only ever drank the tea we knew we liked we'd never find the other tea we never knew existed

    If I was re-imagining them I'd probably replace the fron panels with a single post (probably centered on the X of the underside members) which I think would resolve most of the things that I dislike about them. I'm mostly not sure about the balance issues of that, you could leave the long front parts on the X at the bottom and add feet under the ends of it I suppose. It does complicate the joinery sligthly on that part of the chair but I don't think unduly so.

    Anyway - its always interesting food for thought.

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