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Thread: Installing the Freestyle Woodcarver by Arbortech

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
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    Installing the Freestyle Woodcarver by Arbortech

    I've just assembled the Freestyle Woodcarver to my angle grinder, which I have never used. Here are pictures of the assembly. If you have experience with this thing, I would appreciate your comments in case I have missed something.

    This is the naked tool:
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    The lower bushing with the fibre washer from the kit. I needed the washer to remove some play in the cutter when assembled.
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    The cutter in place.
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    Nylon bushing that came with the kit. The assembly instructions were vague, but I couldn't tighten the blade without this, in this position.
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    The upper bushing in place and tight.
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    The whole shebang, with the auxiliary guard in place.
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    I am not sure if this looks quite right, or what angle I am supposed to use the cutter at. With the auxiliary guard in place, it pretty well has to be at 90. I'm not going to test it today, so I will receive any advice with great attention and thanks.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Amherst, New Hampshire
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    Not sure Roger but my guess would be to lose the plastic guard and go with it just like the way you have it in the 3rd picture.
    The plastic shroud looks like it defeats the whole purpose of the grinder
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
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    Hmm. With a little more digging I found a 39 sec. video. It looks the same as my getup, and apparently is presented to the wood at about an 80 angle. I'll try it out this week. I got it to make bum sockets for chairs.
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    The Gorge Area, Oregon
    Posts
    4,699
    I've used the carbide burr cutter on the angle grinder quite a bit. The third picture looks about right relative to my setup.

    Make sure to keep both hands on the grinder until it spins down, there is quite a bit of centripetal force and it can jump if it's still turning and you rotate it (like when seeing it down). Lost a good chunk of finger that way!!!

    Will be interested to see how you like it

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,807
    Flip the nut, in the fourth picture, holding the whole thing on over, it will have more surface area touching the actual cutter and will be safer that way.

    I've used them several times digging out rotten wood from floor joists, they work really well and man to they remove material. For your seat bottoms go real easy at first, in fact you should practise on some scrap first.
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
    Posts
    6,099
    Regardless how difficult you think it is with a guard on, please leave them on your hand grinders. Had one student injured in my school shop, a couple of past students injured at their work places with grinders without guards. Here is a good discussion of grinders and guards, http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/a.../t-193120.html

    Check out grinder accidents for proof of injuries.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, FL
    Posts
    472
    Looks like the drone version of the helicopter tree trimmer recently shown here.

    Make it battery powered, attach it to your remote controlled drone and trim you hedges from your ez-chair!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    Flip the nut, in the fourth picture, holding the whole thing on over, it will have more surface area touching the actual cutter and will be safer that way.

    I've used them several times digging out rotten wood from floor joists, they work really well and man to they remove material. For your seat bottoms go real easy at first, in fact you should practise on some scrap first.
    Thanks, Stu. If I'd looked at it harder, I might have realized that would work. It was kind of obvious once you pointed it out to me.

    Jonathan, I wouldn't think of using this thing without the safety guard. I like my fingers, and legs, and other parts...
    Cheers,
    Roger


    The other member of Mensa, but not the NRA

    Everyone is a self-made person.

    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their veracity" -Abraham Lincoln

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