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Thread: Drill Press Recommendation

  1. #1

    Drill Press Recommendation

    Hi

    I've got a little sears benchtop model that I bought at a garage sale several years ago, thinking about upgrading, what would you suggest?

    Can't go the benchtop route with a bigger unit, not enough space so I"ll have to cram it in a corner somewhere or move it around. I guess that means that I could use a rolling base recommendation as well

    Thanks

    Jay

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ozarks
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    jay, i haven`t noticed much differance in the under 1k tai/chi drill presses.... i bought a jet model on sale several years ago and i`ve had an older delta that got a case of wobbly spindle after several years of abuse...in my shop i can`t justify more than a few hundred bucks for a drill press so i`ve stuck to the imports... when you shop look for quill travel, a 5/8 chuck and at least 3/4hp.....then pick a color...tod
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    I bought a Delta bench top several years ago. Probably close to 15 years ago. Just found out that spindle is not as rigid as I thought. It kept walking with 3/4" forstner bit in it. I have two 1940's or early 50's Craftsman that need restoring in my shop. Since I was in need I decided to try one of them as is. Had to lube it to get the spindle to move smoothly and just did a quick clean up.

    This DP was so far superior to the newer Delta! I have been using it as is, rust an all. I realize now that that Delta is just a marginal quality DP. Not junk but not very good either.

    So don't be scared of old used one. If you looking at a new one, don't look toward the bottom of the barrel either unless you like regretting it latter. I will be selling my Delta once I get these other two restored.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Placitas, NM in the foothills of the Sandia Mt
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    I don't think there is a whole lot of difference between the brands, but they all have a range of models. If I were upgrading, I would give variable speed some serious thought. Changing belts is a hassle and sometimes I give in and drill at the wrong speed just to get it done.

    Other features that are important to me is amount of run-out (check it when you get it in the shop and send it back if its excessive), distance of quill travel, number of speeds (I use a circle cutter which wants a slloooww speed), and size of table.

    I have seen some plans that build a removeable cabinet around the bottom part of the drill press. With the storage the cabinet brings, a stand up unit can be even more space efficient than a bench unit.

    As to mobile bases, I don't like them. The DP is top heavy anyhow. I like mine mounted to the concrete floor.

    Post a pic of the new toy!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Constantine, MI
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    Jay,

    I agree with Jesse, a mobile base under a top heavy DP is asking for trouble.
    If you're looking for a good solid machine for a reasonable price you might want to look into the Rigid. Nice price and a lifetime warranty. I recently purchased the Rikon and was very disapointed to find out the massive 3/4" chuck can't hold anything smaller than 1/4" - so now I have the floor model AND a bench top.
    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Rennie Heuer View Post
    Jay,

    I agree with Jesse, a mobile base under a top heavy DP is asking for trouble.
    If you're looking for a good solid machine for a reasonable price you might want to look into the Rigid. Nice price and a lifetime warranty. I recently purchased the Rikon and was very disapointed to find out the massive 3/4" chuck can't hold anything smaller than 1/4" - so now I have the floor model AND a bench top.
    I'll take a look at the Rigid, thanks for the advice the HD is close and I won't have to pay shipping

    Yes, I understand about the top heavy nature of the beast, but I don't have a dedicated shop so I need to be able to move it around in the garage. Would be interested in any sucess stories about mobile bases if anyone has one!

    Jay

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, CANADA
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    Jay, I built a mobile base for my Delta 16.5 inch variable speed drill. Its a 3/4 inch piece of plywood cut to 30" by 24" and the base of the drill press is bolted to the plywood. I attached this set of casters under the plywood (http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...133&cat=1,240).

    I move the drill press a lot becuase my shop is so crowded and have no problems at all. Yes, the top is heavy but the unit is in no danger of tipping over.

    The one problem is that the base increases the height of the drill press by 5.5 inches. I am thinking of building some sort of base that would have the casters off to the side so that the height is only raised by a couple of inches, but that task is well down on my list of "nice to haves".
    Cheers, Frank

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Jay, maybe I'm too late but if not, take a look at the Delta 17-965. I bought one because it has a quill lock. That's a feature I have on my old 1943 Craftsman-Atlas and 1932 Walker-Turner DPs and use frequently. The Delta was the only DP I could find with that feature that was also in my "affordable" price range. The rest of the drill press is very good as well. The only thing it doesn't have is the unique sound of my W-T. It was my father's and it's the DP I first used.

  9. #9
    Dave

    thanks for the suggestion, I'll look into it. When would you use a quill lock? Putting a sanding drum on the machine?

    Jay

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    SE Minnesota
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    That would be one time although I prefer not to use my drill press as a drum sander. I don't believe they are designed for the side loading imposed by sanding.

    With power off I will bring the bit down into contact with the work and lock the quill. This gives me a chance to either clamp the work to the table or clamp a fence against the work.

    My father used the old Walker-Turner to stir cans of paint. He could chuck up a stirring rod--usually homemade--and lock the quill down so the stirring rod was in the paint. He'd turn the DP on at low speed and go off to set up the ladder or whatever. In a little while he'd come back to a nicely stirred can of paint.

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