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Thread: Restoring a 1948 Delta HD Shaper

  1. #1
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    Restoring a 1948 Delta HD Shaper

    Finally started the restoration of my shaper. A four footed 1948 Delta HD cabinet. It's one a owner and been in storage for close to 2 years (thats 20 years). It's a sad looking puppy but it is very original. I didn't take a photo but it still had the warranty tag from Young & Vann that sold the machine new.

    It's mechanically in pretty good shape. I plugged it up and the original R/I motor just jumped to life. Forward and reverse worked but the list mechanism is very tight. I hear some noise from the bearings too. But I guess 58 year old bearings should be a bit noisy.

    Tonight I just started taking it apart. not much to really talk about so will just post the photos. Depending on whether I get any work this week I am hoping to have it ready to go back together this weekend. But that may be optimistic too.
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    Last edited by Jeff Horton; 12-04-2006 at 11:29 PM.

  2. #2
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    That's a great piece of old iron there Jeff. Very cool.

    Do I see a dual pulley (dual sheave?) on the spindle shaft? Is that how the speeds are changed, if there is actually two different sizes there?

    Will you use this shaper when you're done?

    Lookiing forward to seeing the rest.
    Thanks, Mark.

    Custom Bonehead.

    My diet is working good. I'm down to needing just one chair now.

    "Just think how stupid the average person is, and then realize that half of them are even stupider!" --George Carlin

  3. #3
    Hi Jeff. Looks like you got a good jump on it. I like tinkering with that stuff. Its quiet different how things worked back then and how well things were so well built. The motor on the Olive alone weighed around 100 lbs and the houseing was cast and not stamped.
    I try to optimistic also but some times theres that one little part that it takes tim eto find that gums up the works but when its don and you turn it on and it jumps into action you just sit back and smile.
    Nice job keep em comming
    Reg

  4. #4
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    cool jeff! if you hear or feel any noise in the spindle bearings replace `em! a 6" diameter 5# cutter at 10k rpm really needs to be kept in its path ......once you`re done you`ll wonder how you ever got along with out a shaper.....i think they`re one of the most usefull tools in the shop....tod
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  5. #5
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    It's a single speed Mark. Thats not a double sheave there even thought it does look like one.

    Never had a shaper but I suspect your right Tod. What motivated me to get this one done was two upcoming projects. Both are frame and panel construction. The thoughts of setting up dado's on the TS and switching them out several times motivated me to get this one done. Setup looks much quicker and less annoying. Especially when I find I need one more dado. I hate spending 10-15 minutes swapping out dado's and setting the fence for a 30 second cut.

  6. #6
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    Day 2 progress

    Day 2. Still working but I am taking a break.Since this is the slow season for my work I should be able to spend a lot of time on this project and have it done in a couple weeks. I had the shaper down into it's major components last night when I quit. This afternoon I started taking those down to smaller pieces.

    Since I know a lot of people are interested but scared of restoring something like this I thought I would show how I like to work and offer some tips. Now I am no expert!! I am just one of those people that mechanical things come very easy to me. And I know I still have a lot to learn!

    First thing in taking one apart it try to acquire a manual or preferable a parts diagram. They can be very valuable when you go to put it back together. Also take LOTS of photos as you go. Digital photos are free so there is not excuse if you have a camera! It has saved me a lot of aggravation before. Old Wood Working Machines web site is THE SOURCE for this kind of stuff. And if you have a manual and it is not on the site please copy it and send it in. Manuals are very treasured and useful items.

    Once you start taking it apart I like to keep part organized. I happen to have some small plastic bins and I put similar pieces together.

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    In these I have all the pieces that relate the top in one bin. Parts on the outside of the cabinet in another and internal part in another. Divide it into something that makes sense to you. The shaper is pretty simple so this works for me. Also consider keeping sub assemblies together in zip lock bags. You can write on them with a sharpie. These are great for keeping pieces that go together, together.

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    Now with it all torn down I started cleaning the parts. I have a laundry sink in my Lab so I degrease the part in there. Scrub them with a brush and rinse. Another washing with Go-Jo and dry them with an air hose.

    All the shafts are cleaned with a wire brush on grinder motor. You can polish the bare metal up really well. I wouldn't do that on a a shaft that has a bearing on it or runs at high speeds. Those are precision ground and odds are you want hurt it but I wouldn't take the chance!

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    Here are the parts laid out before and after cleaning. I am not sure you can tell much difference in this photos? I am on the shop computer and it has a old cheap monitor. The painted pieces need some sanding and bit more cleaning before they are ready for paint. The shafts are basically ready to be put back in.

    BTW I don't try to restore the insides of mine back to show room new condition, because I use them. I hope that after a couple of months if you look inside one of my restorations that it is full or saw dust and dirty. So I don't spend a lot of time on the insides making them perfect. Because they are not going to stay that way long. If they do then I need to sell that machine!

  7. #7
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    cool thread jeff! your discriptions should help folks who have never restored a machine feel more confident.....and those who own old or new machines that break to fix `em themselves.....thanks! tod
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  8. #8
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    DAY 3

    Last night after I put my update up I did one more job. I took the column to the lathe and chucked it up. I found a taperer scrap piece and I used for a center. I spun it at a slow speed and cleaned up the shaft with emery cloth to remove all the rust.

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    I thought about this for a long time and decided against painting all the internal parts. What I am doing is really refurbishing this shaper, not restoring it. To me restoring it implies you are making it like new. What I am doing is cleaning it up, painting and getting back in working order. I need this shaper for my next two projects so I want it done pretty quickly. Since the insides are in good shape and the original paint is in good shape I decided to leave it alone.

    I cleaned it up and blew an unbelievable amount of sawdust out from inside of the motor. I am surprised it was still running! I cleaned all the rusty bare metal pieces before installing them. I have spindle and lift together. All I need is a new belt and this is ready to go back in the cabinet. The cabinet... thats another story.

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    I wanted to show what a wire brush can do to a rust piece of bare metal. Unfortunately the photo doesn't really do it justice. But this is guide bar that was badly rusted. All I have done is hit it with wire brush mounted on the grinder.

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    I started some parts cleaning by electrolysis tank but I want to write up something separate on that. It's one of those things that amazes me.

    I cleaned several of the small parts likes the feet and the fence. Applied a couple of coats of Delta (Rustoleum) gray to them. With that I called it a night. After wrestling with the motor, spindle assy and top I am worn out.

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  9. #9
    Hey jeff. If the rust is very bad let me know and I will tell you how to set up an electrolisis tank. It takes all the rust off
    Reg

  10. #10
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    love those ol` feet!
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

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