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Thread: You Guessed it More Steel, A Table

  1. #1
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    You Guessed it More Steel, A Table

    This welding table will be rather straight forward, following my Triple Stack Welding Cart the next thing to build is the welding table for my new metalworking area of my shop.


    It is all tacked together and ready for some welding.

    It is upside down in the picture, you can see I set a caster on the bottom of one leg on the left side. The casters are 10cm tall and with the 9mm thick plate that I'll weld to the bottom of the leg along with a foot that will go down to lift the casters off the ground, the bottom rail of the table with a platform on it should be about the right height to be a good footrest while seated on a stool and welding on the table.

    The five square tubes will be what support the table top, and I'll be able to insert fixtures into the open tubes, things like my vice, or my my roller. I was not sure which would work best, right, left or center, so I decided to put in five possible locations for fixtures to be inserted.

    The top will be 6mm thick, that is the thickest plate I could find, as it is I had to buy a larger piece than I needed, and the home center I bought it from could not cut it. I bought the larger piece and then I bought the plasma torch to cut it to size. The piece if have is about 180cm by 90cm (3'x6'), I'm going to make the table top 135cm x 65cm (53"x25.5") that is about the largest table I could fit in there and still have the ability to move it around when I need to.

    Lots of welding to do on this yet, and then I have to figure a way to attach the top to the table, I don't really want to weld it, I'm thinking something like bolts might be better?

    Any idea on that front would be welcome!

    I'm also toying with the idea of buying a second piece of plate and doubling up the two pieces to make a 12mm thick top, I read on this thread > HERE < on Welding Web, that is may not be such a crazy idea. I would think that for longevity a doubled up 6mm thick plate would last longer than just a single 6mm plate. That being said, the table top will have lots of support, so maybe I'm going overkill here?

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
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    A very patient person who tried to teach me to weld many years ago, finally said I should add welding to a list of things I could not do. So take my comments with that background.

    Strength of materials class, last century, made a big point... if you have two layers of whatever, it will be twice as strong as one layer. But if you have one layer twice as thick, it will be 8 times as strong (thickness to the third power).

    My workbench top consists of two layers of sheet goods, 3/4 thick, laminated together - I clamped it with temporary screws while the glue cured, but would now do it in a vacuum bag.

    If you want the strength of a half inch of steel, you somehow need to make the two 1/4 inch thick layers act as a single sheet. Not knowing welding, can you tack them together over multiple points (like a series of spot welds?) . Or maybe a benchtop that is twice as strong as a 1/4 inch piece of steel is enough, and only need to be tacked or bolted at the edges.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  3. #3
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    If you are going to be using your table as a reference surface for assembly you might want it a bit thicker. I would be afraid that it would quickly warp if you tacked anything to it or welded anything close to it. Strange that you can't find thicker steel. I always think of Japan as a nation with significant industrial capability. Apparently not a lot of fab shops or welding shops around? Maybe I'm spoiled because there are several steel suppliers within an hours drive. My welding table is just a HF hydraulic lift table with a slab of 1/2" plate on it. I think it cost about $80 cut to size. It's so heavy I haven't seen the need to fasten it down...yet.

  4. #4
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    I personally would just use one layer and use the rest for another project. Of course it depends on how much you'll beat on the surface. I've only got a 1/4" plate on my table and it's held up well without any warping, even when I have hammered on it. You mostly want a large flat conductive surface to work on. The things that will warp it is heavy hammering on it or heat. Tacking down pieces for jigs usually won't generate enough heat to cause warping at that thickness.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Calver View Post
    My welding table is just a HF hydraulic lift table with a slab of 1/2" plate on it. I think it cost about $80 cut to size. It's so heavy I haven't seen the need to fasten it down...yet.
    And here I was wishing for a welding table, but apparently, I've recently acquired one! A HF Hydraulic lift table.... Now off to get a slab of steel plate.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    ...I have to figure a way to attach the top to the table, I don't really want to weld it, I'm thinking something like bolts might be better? ...
    Titebond IV?
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  7. #7
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    Weld tabs on the underside so the tabs fit on the inside of the front and back (no movement). Then when the top gets damaged/used up, turn it over, cut off the tabs, weld them on the old topside and flip. Clear as mud?
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan Shively View Post
    Weld tabs on the underside so the tabs fit on the inside of the front and back (no movement). Then when the top gets damaged/used up, turn it over, cut off the tabs, weld them on the old topside and flip. Clear as mud?
    That is a great idea Jonathan, thanks!

    OK this is what I've come up with for an idea for the feet, I saw something similar, I cannot remember where, but I liked it, so I made my own version....








    I'll first make a plywood template on my CNC wood carving machine and use that with the plasma torch to cut these out.


    I think it would work well, I'd cut down the ends of the the leveling feet bolts. and weld a nut on them, then I just put a socket on my impact driver to raise and lower the table so it will be on or off the casters.


    Here is the table all welded up....



    I still have to cut down the large plate for the top, that is the next big thing to do, then I'll use the off cuts to make the foot cantilevers.



    The smaller piece of plate I was using as a welding table before.


    So any thoughts on the foot cantilevers?


    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
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    Have you see this guys setup?

    http://mattinindy.com/?tag=jack

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  10. #10
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    Like Charlie, a skilled and patient person finally gave up and declared that I "weld like a pigeon". I used to hard-face dozer blades in the field but, that hardly requires much skill. Your table looks great and should serve you well.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

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