Building a new shop with attached house - Done.

Don Baer

Moderator
Staff member
Don't know if this realy belongs here since I not doing the work but that OK it does show construction from the groudn up.

We signed the contract Sept 6th and they said it would be 3-4 weeks since they needed to pull pirmits. I guess the building slow down is helping, maybe that will mean that the rest of the construction may go faster then there estimated 4-5 months. The house is 3000 sq.ft with a 3 car attached garage that will serve as a shop until I can get the funds together to build the seperate shop. it is all on one level. Here is the plot plan.

Plot plan.jpg

Here is the trenching on on 9/26

Pic 1.jpg

And finaly the footings are done on 10/27


Footer 1.jpgFooter 3.jpgfooter 4.jpg
 
Last edited:
Messages
917
Location
Charleston
Don, where are you building? If I recall correctly you are in AZ and I used to live in Scottsdale until Dec '05. Looks like a nice spread but you might miss the trees. Did they clear cut or is this a planned community?
 
S

Steve Clardy

Guest
I like the title of your post.

Shop/garage with------------------attached house:cool: :D
 

Frank Chaffee

Member
Messages
231
Location
Arena, Wisconsin
Looks good Don,
And sure a lot more builder friendly site then the house I helped build on Black Mountain, where me and my Mexican brother took first picks, then sledge hammer and bar to dig footings in caleche where the backhoe could not go.

Frank Chaffee
 

Don Baer

Moderator
Staff member
Rough Plumbing is in

I stoppped by to check on the progress and all of the underground plumbing is in and the inspector has signed off on it.

Rough Plumbing 2.jpg

Next they'll fill in the trenches and level the sub slab and then pour the slab. I took a lot more detailed shots in case I need them later but I won't bore you with picture of a bunch on pipes.
 

Don Baer

Moderator
Staff member
The slab is poured.

Stopped by today to check the weeks progress and here's what we found.

Garage slab 1.jpgGarage Slab 2.jpg


Here some pics of the garage. The smaller one will be the woodworking shop and will house the TS, BS, CMS, Planer, Joiner lathe etc after I build a wall. The larger one will house LOML's Suburban, Compressor misc garage stuff and I will use it as a finidh area.

House slab sw CORNER.jpgHouse Slab NW Corner.jpg

And here is the house slab in the picture on the left there is the corner of a 4' square which will hold one of the 2 HVAC units. This is the NW corner of the house. On the NE corner not shown is and identical 4'x'4' slab for the other unit.


Patio slab.jpg


And this is the 50'x10' patio.
 

Frank Chaffee

Member
Messages
231
Location
Arena, Wisconsin
Don,
Vaughn and Mark Singer can give professional explanations of “Post-tensioning”, but until they do I will share what I recollect from my layman interest in the subject.

Post-tensioning of concrete slabs or beams involves the tightening of rods or cables by mechanical or hydraulic means after poured concrete has achieved a specified percentage of its design strength. The steel is typically sleeved so tensioning is not inhibited by friction losses.

It is commonly used in bridge, parking garage, etc., and slab construction in multi-storey buildings, but I doubt that an engineer would spec that for a slab-on-grade on compacted earth of stable composition for a residence.

Perhaps the check box exists on the form for civil, commercial, or the rare residential requirement of post-tensioning.

Now you have me interested in this, and I await word from pro/gurus on the subject as well.

Frank Chaffee
 
S

Steve Clardy

Guest
Don,
Vaughn and Mark Singer can give professional explanations of “Post-tensioning”, but until they do I will share what I recollect from my layman interest in the subject.

Post-tensioning of concrete slabs or beams involves the tightening of rods or cables by mechanical or hydraulic means after poured concrete has achieved a specified percentage of its design strength. The steel is typically sleeved so tensioning is not inhibited by friction losses.

It is commonly used in bridge, parking garage, etc., and slab construction in multi-storey buildings, but I doubt that an engineer would spec that for a slab-on-grade on compacted earth of stable composition for a residence.

Perhaps the check box exists on the form for civil, commercial, or the rare residential requirement of post-tensioning.

Now you have me interested in this, and I await word from pro/gurus on the subject as well.

Frank Chaffee

Yes. My framer son, tells me they are beginning to do a lot of that in Texas.
 

Jim O'Dell

Member
Messages
2,784
Location
Between Aledo and Fort Worth, TX
Jim, you just don't see basements in the south. Don't know why. It would make sense to double them up for storm protection, and a cool place to get to in the summer. My grandparents built a walk out basement in a house they built back in 1968, in Ada, Ok. Blasted solid rock out for weeks to do it. Grandma was deathly afraid of storms, and for good reason. She ended up under the foundation of a house in Antlers, OK in 1945. Spent a year in the hospital, and sported a steel plate on her skull the rest of her life. This walk out basement was their storm cellar. The only other house that had something similar was my grandparents house before they built the new one. Had a cellar either under or off the side of the garage, that you enterend from the garage. Never knew of another house in Ada that had that. But you just don't see basements in any numbers. Jim.
 
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